Skip to main content

Features

Night Flying With Safety

Made Possible By the Men Who Keep the Beacon Lights Burning Along Our Airways

By Andrew R. Boone

One Man Who is Having Fun

By Albert G. Ingalls

And Now the Neutron

With the discovery of the neutron, science now has one more physical entity to juggle with. Though some of the press appears several weeks ago to have given the impression that the neutron was a brand new lucky strike, physicists have suspected for years that some such thing was "hiding out" and if sought would sooner or later be brought to light by experiment. The accompanying discussion is more mature than it could have been had it been written earlier. It was especially prepared for the SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN by a writer, himself a Cambridge man, who is in close personal touch with the principals now engaged in the brilliant researches going on in the famous Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University, England.—The Editor.

By J. G. Crowther

Atomic Energy—is it Nearer?

Some weeks ago the scientific world was most agreeably surprised when word was flashed across the Atlantic that two young English physicists, Dr. J. D. Cockcroft and Dr. E. T. S. Walton, working in the Cavendish Laboratory of Physics at Cambridge, had split the atom, effected a transmutation of elements and as a by-product had succeeded in releasing some of the higher intra-atomic energy concerning which a great deal has been prophesied during the past three decades. The accompanying article is largely a commentary on that striking bit of news, which may later prove to have contained inestimable significance not alone in pure science but to the world at large.—The Editor

By Waldemar Kaempffert

Something New--Aluminum Jewelry

By C. M. Hoke

A Super Viaduct

Longest of Its Kind in the World

By Frank A. Reddan

How America Was First Peopled

By Marius Barbeau

The Coming Eclipse

A booklet entitled "Total Eclipse of the Sun, August 31, 1932," obtainable from the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. for 25 cents (stamps not acceptable), contains detailed meteorological and astronomical data on the eclipse, with a large map. A last-minute circular from the United States Naval Observatory indicates a shift of the path of totality westward by approximately seven tenths of a mile.

By Henry Norris Russell

New Indictments Against Insect Pests

More Harness for the Susquehanna

Safe Harbor, Linked With Conowingo and Holtwood Plants, Completes Harnessing of Historic Eastern River

From the Archeologist's Note Book

Herculaneum Emerges From Solidified Mud

On the Captain's Bridge

By A. A. Hopkins

Serpent Worship in Africa

By Wilfrid D. Hambly

Indoor Fruit Orchards

Ancient Oriental Horticultural Dwarfing Methods May Be Applied to Common Fruit Trees

By A. N. Mirzaoff

Departments

  • Departments

    Across the Editor's Desk, August 1932

  • Back of Frontispiece, August 1932

  • An Eight-Ton, 1575-Horsepower Leviathan of the Air

  • Our Point of View, August 1932

  • Clothing Reform, Stainless Steel Coins and more

  • Supreme Court Refuses to Modify "Packers Consent Decree", Cable Patent Claims Invalid and more

  • Books Selected by the Editors, August 1932

Purchase To Read More

Already purchased this issue? Sign In to Access
Select Format
August 1932

See the World from a Different Perspective

Subscribe to Scientific American MIND