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Features

Breeding Machine Brains

Machine Design Evolutionary, Basic Design Ideas, New Materials, Processes Demand New Machines, Empirical Designer Most Successful

By Philip H. Smith

The Road to Empire--II

Excavating the Sacred Well of Minturnae, and the Peculiar Surprise that was Found in it. What to do After Lightning has Struck a Public Building

By Jotham Johnson

Science at the Scene of Crime

How Special Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Operate, Photography, Blood Tests, Preservation of Evidence, Moulage

By J. Edgar Hoover

High Efficiency From New Lamps

Rainbow Colors, Sun-Like Brilliancy, Still in Laboratory Stage, May Open Vast New Fields

Are We Inside a Dark Nebula?

Recent Investigations Suggest that Our Part of Space is Slightly Hazy, and Provide a Hypothesis of the Origin of the Sun's Family of Comets

By Henry Norris Russell

High-Speed Paving For California Aqueduct

New streamlined canals

By Andrew R Boone

Your Brain

By G. H. Estabrooks

Tracking Down Your Trade Mark Title

You Own Your Trade Mark, but Can You Prove It?

By Sylvester J. Liddy

Polar Molecules

The New Science of Molecular Structure, Old Puzzles Unpuzzled, The "Why" of Some Things

By Sidney J. French

Arcs Cut Under Water

Electric Torch Rips Submerged Metals, Gases Create Working "Hollow", Oxygen Burns Metal Being Cut, Possible Welder, Many Uses

By R. G. Skerrett

Strange Sensations

Tests for Color Blindness, Most Prevalent in Males, Color Blind Interior Decorators, Taste is also Deficient in Some Individuals

By Laurence H. Snyder

Departments

  • 50 Years Ago in Scientific American, July 1936

  • Recommended

    Book Selected by the Editors, July 1936

  • Departments

    Personalities in Science, July 1936

  • In a Valley of Noisy Giants

  • Our Point of View, July 1936

  • Pawnbroker's Microscope, Biologist Produces a Unicorn and more

  • Current Bulletin Briefs, July 1936

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July 1936

See the World from a Different Perspective

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