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Industry Needs More Light

Plant Lighting Lags Behind Engineers' Knowledge, Designed Systems Speed Production, Decrease Spoilage and Accidents, Inexpensive

By A. K. Gaetjens

New Light On The Sumerians

Though Science Remains Ignorant of Their Origin, Recent Archeological Discoveries Have Increased Our Knowledge of this Mysterious Ancient People

By E. A. Speiser

Trees On A Salty Isle

The Odd New-Old Star

The Much-Talked-of Huge Star in Auriga Yields to Astrophysical Interpretation: an Eclipsing Binary With an Almost Grazing Type of Eclipse

By Henry Norris Russell

Power From Bacteria

Troublesome Pulp Mill Waste Supplies Gas for Power . . . Swamp Bacteria Do the Work . . . Fifty Year Old Problem Solved for the Pulp Wood Industry

By M. K. Elwood

From Steel To Streamliner

By A. P. Peck

The Diesel Broadens Its Field

"Packaged Power" for Many Uses . . . A Complete Power Plant in One Unit . . . How Will Increased Fuel Demand Affect the Market Price?

By Reginald M. Cleveland

The 'Fourth Transcontinental'

Northern Lights

Why the Scientist Studies the Aurora: Research that Is Bound up Closely with a Number of Other Phenomena in the Upper Regions of the Atmosphere

By A. S. Eve

Can Man Create Life?

Important Discoveries . . . How Disease Viruses May Originate . . . The Newer Understanding of Viruses and its Significance . . . Is Life Only a Mechanism?

By Barclay Moon Newman

Departments

  • 50 Years Ago in Scientific American, April 1938

  • Recommended

    Books Selected By The Editors, April 1938

  • Departments

    Molten Strength And Light Weight

  • Our Point Of View, April 1938

  • Electrical Sense Of Balance, Refinement and more

  • Exercise In Lighting, The Leica Camera Gun and more

  • Camera Angles Round Table

  • Telescoptics, April 1938

  • Current Bulletin Briefs, April 1938

  • Price Cutting, Outside the Pale and more

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April 1938

See the World from a Different Perspective

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