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Features

Food for Britain Helps Us

An Apparent Paradox in Modern Nutrition

By T. Swann Harding

Transfusions, Sensitive, and more

Blood Types Now Quickly Determined

Our Navy's Air Arm

Flying Sailors of the United States Have Long Been Regarded as Best Trained in the World

By James L. H. Peck

Water 'Chuting, Fluorescent, and more

Marines Use Gas Inflated Jackets

Rolling Off a Log

Plywood Made Available for Many New Applications by Development of Synthetic Adhesives

By Thomas D. Perry

Duplicating Without Dies

Short-Run Production Requirements in Metal Shapes Met by Ingenious Hand-Operated Tools

By A. P. Peck

Telephone Savings

Reclamation And Substitution For Conservation

Steel, Aluminum Clay, and more

Orbit Sleuthing

How the Astronomer Determines the Size and Shape of a Double Star's Orbit

By Henry Norris Russell

Fidgety Atoms Purify Water

Ozone Treatment of Community Supplies Has Proved Efficient in Practical Applications

By R. G. Skerrett

Excavating for Meteorites

One Large and Two Small Craters Made by Violent Impact are Under Geologic Exploration in Texas

Weed Killer, Battling Bats, and more

For Lawns, Does Not Injure Grass

Night Vision

A British Army Medical Officer Considers a Subject of Vital Interest to Aviation in Particular

By Alexander Klemin

Shop Lighting, Happy Speaks, and more

Fluorescent Tube Used in Portable Unit

Distilled Water, Jack, and more

Obtained By Process Using No Heat

Departments

  • 50 Years Ago, March 1942

  • From the Editor

    Our Point of View, March 1942

  • Recommended

    Our Book Corner, March 1942

  • Departments

    Personalities in Industry, March 1942

  • Industrial Trends, March 1942

  • Camera Angles, March 1942

  • Current Bulletin Briefs, March 1942

  • Telescoptics, March 1942

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March 1942

See the World from a Different Perspective

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