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Fighting Factory Fires

Fire Losses Do Not All Appear in the Statistics. Small and Unreported Fires are Quickly Controlled With Portable Equipment. But the Right Kind Must be at Hand at the Right Time, and Employees Must Know How to Use it. Water is still a Good All-Around Extinguishant

By Edwin Laird Cady

Nonferrous Metals Tomorrow

The War Has Framed the Futures of the Nonferrous Metals With a Number of Provocative Question Marks. How Will Aluminum, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Lead, and Other Important Metals Fare Individually When Peace-Time Competition Really Gets Tough? Some of the Answers are Clear Now

By Fred P. Peters

Electronic Sorting

Automatic Operation is Attained With the Cathode-Ray Tube. By Blacking-Out Parts of the Tube's Screen, Light Shows Only When Defective Parts Pass on the Production Line. A Photocell Watches the Screen and Activates a Reject Mechanism When it Sees Light, Giving Highly Accurate Results

By Keith Henney

Safety with Solvents

Many New Industries Are Using New Solvents in New Processes. In Order That Workers May he Protected Against Possible Danger from these Substances, a Number of Agencies are Co-Operating. Standards of Vapor Concentration are Being Set, and Preventive Measures Developed

By D. H. Killeffer and H. P. Ouadland

Keep Them Tight

Though the Bolt Designers Most Diligently Design, and the Metallurgists, the Engineers, and Manufacturers do their Utmost to Provide Excellent Bolts, the Bolts that Carry Dynamic, Fluctuating Loads in Severe Service will Fail from Fatigue unless Science is Correctly Applied in Tightening Them

By Albert G. Ingalls

Safely In The Air

In the Science of Biomechanics, Combining the Knowledge of Surgeons and Engineers, is to be Found at Least a Part of the Answer to Fatal Aircraft Accidents. An Understanding of the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Human Body can Aid Aircraft Designers in Building Safer Ships

By Alexander Klemin

Detenderizing Glass

Not All Glass is Fragile. Glass Intended for Safety Lenses is Changed from Tender to Tough by the Comparatively Simple application of a Trick That Reverses its Normal Stresses and Puts the Surface Under Compression Balanced by Internal Tension. Industrial Eye Injuries Can be Reduced

By T. A. Walsh

Departments

  • 50 Years Ago, August 1944

  • Recommended

    Our Book Corner, August 1944

  • Departments

    Previews of the Industrial Horizon, August 1944

  • August 1944" id="article-quotes-1944-08">

    "Quotes," August 1944

  • New Products, August 1944

  • Current Bulletin Briefs, August 1944

  • Telescoptics, August 1944

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August 1944

See the World from a Different Perspective

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