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The Hydrogen Bomb: IV

What is the problem of organizing an effective civil defense against it? The last in a series of four articles on the thermonuclear weapon

By Ralph E. Lapp

Genetic Monsters

The abnormal descendants of normal animals are significant experiments of nature. The geneticist studies them to learn the role of the gene in both abnormal and normal development

By L. C. Dunn

The Earth's Magnetism

For centuries man has used but not understood it. Recently two theories have been put forward in order to explain its origin

By A. E. Benfield

Proteins

The large molecules characterized by nitrogen are synonymous with life. Their structure and function are fundamental problems of chemistry

By Joseph S. Fruton

The Great Meteor of 1947

Little has been told of the small asteroid that three years ago crashed into a Siberian forest. A brief account of one of the most impressive natural events witnessed by man

By Otto Struve

Coronary Thrombosis

One of the principal causes of sudden death, it is the culmination of slow processes in coronary artery disease

By Paul D. White

Life of a Thunderstorm

The structure of the violent atmospheric phenomenon has long been unclear. Now it is known to incorporate "cells"

By Roscoe R. Braham

Gas from the Mine

An experiment now being conducted in the South will measure the practicality of harvesting the energy of coal by burning it underground instead of mining it

By Leonard Engel

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: June 1950

  • Science and the Citizen: June 1950

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, June 1950

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Astronomer

  • Departments

    Bibliography

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June 1950

See the World from a Different Perspective

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