Skip to main content

Features

The State of Genetics

Last summer the geneticists of many lands gathered for a week on Long Island. Their discussions reflected the ferment of a science that is changing both itself and the other provinces of biology

By A. Buzzati-Traverso

Synthetic Detergents

The shortcomings of soap have given rise to a whole new family of cleansing substances. In the U. S. they are now consumed at a rate of a billion pounds a year

By Lawrence M. Kushner and James I. Hoffman

The Neutron

The uncharged fundamental particle is used on a vast scale to propagate the nuclear chain reaction and to probe the nature of matter. Of itself, however, it is something of an enigma

By Philip and Emily Morrison

Radiation from a Reactor

The photograph on the cover is the first to reveal the interior of an operating atomic pile. Of special interest to the physicist is the blue glow that surrounds the chain-reacting fuel elements

By W. H. Jordan

Ernest Starling

The great English physiologist discovered hormones and the Law of the Heart. Although his name is remembered by his scientific successors, it has been forgotten by history to a curious degree

Halloween

The eve of November 1 is both a solemn religious occasion and a time of games and pranks. Many of its customs descend from a Druidical holiday that involved burning men in cages

By Ralph Linton

Life in the Depths of a Pond

The quiet waters of a small lake are an active universe of living things. On or near the bottom are tiny animals that are related to the whole yet unique in their adaptation to special conditions

By Edward S. Deevey Jr.

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: August 1951

  • Input-Output Economics

  • Science and the Citizen: August 1951

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, October 1951

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Astronomer

  • Departments

    Erratum

  • Bibliography

Purchase To Read More

Already purchased this issue? Sign In to Access
Select Format
October 1951

See the World from a Different Perspective

Subscribe to Scientific American MIND