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Features

A Crisis in Science Teaching

In which the continuing shortage of scientists and engineers is traced back to the high schools. As their enrollments soar, the number of qualified science teachers actually decreases

By Fletcher G. Watson

The Rabbit Plague

It is the strange virus disease myxomatosis. In Australia, where the animals are destructive pests, it is a blessing;in Europe, where they are cherished game, it is a calamity

By Frank Fenner

A Family of Solar Eclipses

On June 30 the moon will blot out the sun on a path from Nebraska to Pakistan. This eclipse is one of a series lasting for 13 centuries, thereby illustrating the complex motions of the earth and the moon

By Richard M. Sutton

The Shape of Raindrops

They are not handsomely tapered but often resemble a small hamburger bun. This unpoetical form, frozen by high-speed photography, is analyzed to reveal the forces that mold it

By James E. McDonald

Curiosity in Monkeys

Some amusing experiments of the psychological laboratory indicate that this trait of primates may be an even more fundamental part of their make-up than previously thought

By Robert A. Butler

Ultramicrochemistry

The early study of plutonium, when only microscopic amounts of the metal were available, stimulated a kind of chemistry that deals with quantities measured in millionths of a gram

By Burris B. Cunningham

The End of the Moas

A swamp filled with bones indicates that these enormous wingless birds lived in New Zealand when knighthood flowered in Europe. Then they vanished. Were they exterminated by aboriginal man?

By Edward S. Deevey Jr.

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: February 1954

  • Science and the Citizen: February 1954

  • Blood

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, February 1954

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist

  • Departments

    The Authors

  • Bibliography

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