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Features

The Antarctic and the Upper Atmosphere

The lines of force in the earth's magnetic field bend down over the poles; hence the Antarctic is a key location for observing the interaction of the field and charged particles from the sun

By Sir Charles Wright

The Antarctic Ocean

The Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans meet in a distinct body of water that wheels around Antarctica. It absorbs heat from the other oceans and its cold bottom waters creep beyond the Equator

By V. G. Kort

The Ice of the Antarctic

Some 2,500 miles across and an average of more than a mile thick, the Antarctic glacier is one of the major features of the earth's surface. Whether it is growing or shrinking is still undetermined

By Gordon de Q. Robin

The Land of the Antarctic

Because most of it lies below the ice, which in some places pushes it below sea level, it is explored by such methods as setting off explosions and analyzing the reflected and refracted seismic waves

By G. P. Woollard

The Ancient Life of the Antarctic

The puzzle of Antarctic history is that ice now covers a land where forests once grew in a temperate climate. This suggests that the continents or the poles, or both, may have wandered

By George A. Doumani and William E. Long

The Oceanic Life of the Antarctic

The waters around Antarctica, which support few species but large populations, are one of the richest biological provinces on earth. The key organism in the simple food chain is the shrimplike krill

By Robert Cushman Murphy

The Terrestrial Life of the Antarctic

It is as poor as the oceanic life is rich. There are no terrestrial vertebrates and only three flowering plants. The fauna is made up of tiny invertebrates; the flora, of such primitive plants as lichens

By George A. Llano

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: September 1962

  • The Antarctic and the Weather

  • Science and the Citizen: September 1962

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, September 1962

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Mathematical Recreation

    Mathematical Games

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist

  • Departments

    The Authors

  • Bibliography

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