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Superconductivity at Room Temperature

It has not yet been achieved, but theoretical studies suggest that it is possible to synthesize organic materials that, like certain metals at low temperatures, conduct electricity without resistance

By W. A. Little

Fiber-Reinforced Metals

Modern knowledge of defects in solids opens a way to increase the strength of materials. A promising technique combines strong fibers such as crystal "whiskers" and a matrix of metal

By Anthony Kelly

Texture and Visual Perception

Random-dot patterns generated by computer show that the recognition of familiar shapes is not needed for the discrimination of textures or even, as had been thought, for the binocular perception of depth

By Bela Julesz

The Skin

The human body's largest organ, this protective envelope not only stabilizes temperature and blood pressure but also gives rise to the hair patches, odors and shades of color characteristic of man

By William Montagna

The Genetics of a Bacterial Virus

The T4 virus is a simple form of life with a precise architecture dictated by genes in its DNA molecule. By mapping the genes and learning their function one learns how the virus is put together

By R. S. Edgar and R. H. Epstein

How Opiates Change Behavior

In which rats that administer morphine to themselves become addicted whereas animals that receive the drug passively do not. This result suggests that human addiction depends on the circumstances of intake

By John R. Nichols

The Age of the Orion Nebula

This magnificent swirl of gas is made luminous by the ultraviolet radiation of hot young stars that are embedded in it. Its motions indicate that it may have begun to shine only some 23,000 years ago

By Peter O. Vandervoort

The Greeks and the Hebrews

The relation between these two peoples of the ancient Mediterranean is seldom, mentioned. Evidence that the oldest language of Crete is Semitic, however, suggests that the two cultures have common roots

By Cyrus H. Gordon

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: February 1965

  • Science and the Citizen: February 1965

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, February 1965

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Mathematical Recreation

    Mathematical Games

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist

  • Departments

    The Authors

  • Bibliography

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February 1965

See the World from a Different Perspective

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