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Third-Generation Pesticides

The first generation is exemplified by arsenate of lead; the second, by DDT. Now insect hormones promise to provide insecticides that are not only more specific but also proof against the evolution of resistance

By Carroll M. Williams

Integrated Computer Memories

The standard computer memory consists of ring-shaped ferrite "cores" threaded on wires. In the search for bigger, faster and less costly memories a number of microelectronic devices are being investigated

By Jan A. Rajchman

Tektites and Geomagnetic Reversals

The glassy stones strewn from the Indian Ocean to the South Pacific have an age that is coincident with the last reversal of the earth's magnetic field. Can both be attributed to the fall of a cosmic body?

By Billy P. Glass and Bruce C. Heezen

Escape From Paradox

Paradoxes and other apparently unsolvable problems can sometimes be solved by broadening the logical framework in which they are presented. A stubborn paradox in game theory provides an example

By Anatol Rapoport

Building a Bacterial Virus

T4 viruses with mutations in certain genes produce unassembled viral components. These particles are combined in the test tube in an effort to learn how the genes of a virus specify its shape

By R. S. Edgar and William B. Wood

The Leakage Problem in Fusion Reactors

To obtain useful power from thermonuclear reactions it is necessary to contain a plasma of ions and electrons in a magnetic bottle. The bottles leak, which presents the theoretician with a difficult task

By Francis F. Chen

Pre-Columbian Ridged Fields

In four areas of tropical lowland in South America there are huge arrays of ancient earthworks. Many of them are ridges put up to farm land subject to seasonal flooding

By James J. Parsons and William M. Denevan

General Tom Thumb and Other Midgets

He was a midget of a type that has not been known to lack pituitary hormone. Now it is clear that such midgets have a deficiency of the pituitary's growth hormone, which indicates that they can be treated

By David L. Rimoin and Victor A. McKusick

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: July 1967

  • Science and the Citizen: July 1967

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, July 1967

  • Recommended

    Books

  • Mathematical Recreation

    Mathematical Games

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist

  • Departments

    The Authors

  • Bibliography

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July 1967

See the World from a Different Perspective

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