Skip to main content

Features

The Slide Fastener

Otherwise known as the zipper, it took hold, so to speak, some 60 years ago. It is the creation of a host ofinventors going back to Elias Howe of the sewing machine, and the end is not in sight

By Lewis Weiner

The Physiological Ecology of Whales and Porpoises

Like other mammals, these marine species have a high-energy way of life. In pursuing it they evolved particular adaptations of their own, notably the ability to dive deep for long periods

By John W. Kanwisher and Sam H. Ridgway

Physical Disability and Public Policy

The civil rights of disabled Americans require a more accessible environment. The present Administration, however, hesitates to enforce laws calling for the removal of architectural barriers

By Gerben DeJong and Raymond Lifchez

Peking Man

In 230,000 years of cave dwelling Homo erectus pekinensis left an abundance of fossils and artifacts that now give information on biological, technological and perhaps even social evolution

By Lin Shenglong and Wu Rukang

Giant Volcanic Calderas

They are craters tens of kilometers in diameter that remain after eruptions far more violent than any in the span ofhuman history. Perhaps 10 of them have been created over the past million years

By Peter Francis

Dark Matter in Spiral Galaxies

It appears that much of the matter in spiral galaxies emits no light. Moreover, it is not concentrated near the center of the galaxies

By Vera C. Rubin

A Vector for Introducing New Genes into Plants

The induction of a plant tumor by a bacterium is a natural form of genetic engineering. The piece of DNA the bacterium injects may serve as a tool for the genetic modification of crop plants

By Mary-Dell Chilton

Departments

Purchase To Read More

Already purchased this issue? Sign In to Access
Select Format

Back to School

Get 50% off digital subscriptions of Scientific American and Scientific American MIND!