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Features

The Dynamic Earth

Presenting an issue on the earth as a system ofinteracting fluids, including living matter. Some of the Rows are fast; others slow, but overall the planet is maintained in a remarkably steady state

By Raymond Siever

The Earth's Core

Indirect evidence indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward the center but otherwise liquid. It is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field

By Raymond Jeanloz

The Earth's Mantle

The great shell of sllicate that lies above the metallic core is heated by the decay of radiQactive isotopes. The heat energizes massive convection currents in the upper 700 kllometers of the ductile rock

By D. P. McKenzie

The Continental Crust

It is much older than oceanic crust, some of it dating back nearly four billion years. It is constantly reworked, however, by cycles of tectonics, volcanism, erosion and sedimentation

By B. Clark Burchfiel

The Atmosphere

Its dynamic activity serves to distribute the energy of solar radiation received by the earth. Models of this activity help to explain climates of the past and predict those of the future

By Andrew P. Ingersoll

The Biosphere

The totality of microbial, animal and plant lik on the earth not only is sustained by the lithosphere, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere but also has powerfully shaped their evolution

By Preston Cloud

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: September 1983

  • Science and the Citizen, September 1983

  • The Oceanic Crust

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, September 1983

  • Recommended

    Books, September 1983

  • Mathematical Recreation

    Mathematical Games, September 1983

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist, September 1983

  • Departments

    The Authors, September 1983

  • Bibliography, September 1983

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September 1983

See the World from a Different Perspective

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