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Features

The Value of Fundamental Science

Its cost to the taxpayer is only about 5 percent of the cost of applied research and development. Yet it contributes deeply to technology, the education of scientists and the general enrichment of our culture

By Leon M. Lederman

The Infrared Sky

An orbiting, liquid-helium-cooled telescope has made panoramic images of the infrared sky, recording the glow from cold, solid matter in the solar system, the galaxy and the universe at large

By Harm J. Habing and Gerry Neugebauer

How LDL Receptors Influence Cholesterol and Atherosclerosis

The receptors bind particles carrying cholesterol and remove them from the circulation. Many Americans have too few LDL receptors, and so they are at high risk for atherosclerosis and heart attacks

By Michael S. Brown and Joseph L. Goldstein

Modern Baking Technology

Rising demand, new markets and the resulting heavy volume of production have forced commercial bakers to do their work increasingly with advanced machinery and automatic processes

By Samuel A. Matz

The Canopy of the Tropical Rain Forest

Largely unexplored, it is home to one of the most diverse plant and animal communities on the earth. A new way of reaching the canopy allows close observation or its ecology

By Donald R. Perry

The C3 Laser

The alignment of two conventional semiconductor lasers yields a beam of almost perfect purity that enables communication systems to send signals at rates as great as billions of bits, or binary digits, per second

By W. T. Tsang

Mammoth-Bone Dwellings on the Russian Plain

They were built 15,000 years ago by hunting-and-gathering bands. Their complexity and permanence suggest that a profound social change was taking place on the steppe at the end of the great Ice Age

By Mikhail I. Gladkih, Ninelj L. Kornietz and Olga Soffer

Gothic Structural Experimentation

Gothic builders used the cathedrals themselves as models, modifying designs as structural problems emerged. An analysis of buttressing patterns shows that information spread rapidly among building sites

By Robert Mark and William W. Clark

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: November 1984

  • Science and the Citizen, November 1984

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, November 1984

  • Recommended

    Books, November 1984

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist, November 1984

  • Departments

    The Authors, November 1984

  • Computer Recreations, November 1984

  • Bibliography, November 1984

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November 1984

Think Outside the Gift Box