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A Critical Time for Nuclear Nonproliferation

This month the parties to the nuclear nonproliferation treaty meet again to debate how well the agreement is working. The continuing arms buildup by the nuclear powers puts the treaty's future in doubt

By William Epstein

The Adrenal Chromaffin Cell

This cell synthesizes, stores and secretes a complex mixture containing adrenaline, proteins and peptides. Studies of these processes elucidate mechanisms relevant to other secretory cells, which include neurons

By Stephen W. Carmichael and Hans Winkler

The Scanning Tunneling Microscope

A new kind of microscope reveals the structures of surfaces atom by atom. The instrument's versatility may extend to investigators in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology

By Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer

The Classical Vacuum

It is not empty. Even when all matter and heat radiation have been removed from a region of space, the vacuum of classical physics remains filled with a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields

By Timothy H. Boyer

The Mesozoic Vertebrates of Thailand

The northeastern part of the country holds a fossil record spanning more than 100 million years of vertebrate evolution. The record in turn helps to clarify the geologic history of southeastern Asia

By Eric Buffetaut and Rucha Ingavat

Young Supernova Remnants

The remnants of recent stellar explosions in our galaxy are intense X-ray sources. An orbiting telescope has revealed their structure. One has a pulsar; others are expanding shells of shock-heated gas

By Frederick D. Seward, Paul Gorenstein and Wallace H. Tucker

The Antarctic Ice

On the average it is 2,200 meters deep; its climatic history is being learned through the analysis of deep cores. The bedrock of the continent has been mapped

By Uwe Radok

Butterfly Engineering

Butterflies drink nectar, fly and bask in the sun to regulate their internal temperature. Underlying such life-sustaining functions are mechanisms that can be studied according to engineering principles

By Joel G. Kingsolver

Departments

  • 50 and 100 Years Ago: August 1985

  • Science and the Citizen, August 1985

  • Letters

    Letters to the Editors, August 1985

  • Recommended

    Books, August 1985

  • Amateur Scientist

    The Amateur Scientist, August 1985

  • Departments

    The Authors, August 1985

  • Computer Recreations, August 1985

  • Bibliography, August 1985

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August 1985

See the World from a Different Perspective

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