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Features

A MIRROR, CHEAPLY

Coof low-budget astronomymputer power opens a new era

By Corey S. Powell

Where the Money Is

By Anne Eisenberg

Trusted Systems

Devices that enforce machine-readable
rights to use the work of a musician
or author may create secure ways to
publish over the Internet

By Mark Stefik

The Internet: Bringing Order from Chaos

By THE EDITORS

Searching the Internet

Combining the skills of the librarian
and the computer scientist may help
organize the anarchy of the Internet

By Clifford Lynch

SUICIDE PREVENTION

Biochemistry offers some new clues

By Kristin Leutwyler

Revolutionary Stuff

By James Burke

Preserving the Internet

An archive of the Internet may prove
to be a vital record for historians,
businesses and governments

By Brewster Kahle

Netsurfing Without a Monitor

By T. V. Raman

LINGUISTICS

A MATTER
OF LANGUAGE

By W. Wayt Gibbs

Interfaces for Searching the Web

By Marti A. Hearst

Going Digital

Electronic libraries will make
today's Internet pale by comparison.
But building them will not be easy

By Michael Lesk

Filtering Information on the Internet

Look for the labels to decide if unknown
software and World Wide Web sites
are safe and interesting

By Paul Resnick

COMPUTER BOMBS

By W. Wayt Gibbs

CHINA SYNDROME

China's eugenics law makes trouble
for science and business

By Tim Beardsley

BY THE NUMBERS

Global Fertility and Population

By Rodger Doyle

BETTER RED
THAN DEAD

An inexpensive new test instantly
spots harmful E. coli

By Glenn Zorpette

Amphibians On-line

By Sasha Nemecek

Algorithm of the Gods

By Shawn Carlson

Memories Are Made Of...

Pharmaceutical aids to remembering and forgetting

By Tim Beardsley

SOHO Reveals the Secrets of the Sun

A powerful new spacecraft, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, is now monitoring the sun around the clock, providing new clues about our nearest star

By Kenneth R. Lang

Finding Pictures on the Web

By Gary Stix

Multilingualism on the Internet

By Bruno Oudet

Psychiatry's Global Challenge

An evolving crisis in the developing world signals the need for a better understanding of the links between culture and mental disorders

By Arthur Kleinman and Alex Cohen

Discovering Genes for New Medicines

By identifying human genes involved in disease, researchers can create potentially therapeutic proteins and speed the development of powerful drugs

By William A. Haseltine

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes's Discovery of Superconductivity

The turn-of-the-century race to reach temperatures approaching absolute zero led to the unexpected discovery of electric currents that flowed with no resistance

By Rudolf de Bruyn Ouboter

Plants That Warm Themselves

Some plants produce extraordinary heat when they bloom. A few even regulate their temperature within narrow limits, much as if they were warm-blooded animals

By Roger S. Seymour

The Rising Seas

By David Schneider

Commentary: Wonders Molecular Crayons and Mustard Seed Avalanches

Molecular Crayons and Mustard Seed Avalanches

By Philip Morrison and Phylis Morrison

Departments

  • In Brief - Nuclear Waste

  • Juniper Green

  • From the Editor

    Civilizing the Internet

  • Letters

    Letters

  • Recommended

    VISION REVIEWED

  • Anti Gravity

    Body Blow

  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago

    50, 100 and 150 Years Ago: Automatic Typewriter, African Slave Trade, and Instant Coffee

  • In Brief

    IN BRIEF

  • Profile

    Juggling Act

  • Science and the Citizen

    Where Do Turtles Go?

  • Working Knowledge

    Stopping Bullets--Working Knowledge on Kevlar

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March 1997

See the World from a Different Perspective

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