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The Asymmetry between Matter and Antimatter

In 1999 new accelerators will start searching for violations in a fundamental symmetry of nature, throwing open a window to physics beyond the known

By Helen R. Quinn and Michael S. Witherell

The Artistry of Microorganisms

Colonies of bacteria or amoebas form complex patterns that blur the boundary between life and nonlife

By Eshel Ben-Jacob and Herbert Levine

Secrets of the Slime Hag

Loathsome though they may seem, hagfishes may also resemble the earliest animals to have a braincase--making them even older than the first animals to develop a backbone

By Frederic H. Martini

Galaxies behind the Milky Way

Over a fifth of the universe is hidden from view, blocked by dust and stars in the disk of our galaxy. But over the past few years,

By Renée C. Kraan-Korteweg and Ofer Lahav


Three types of safeguards offer a formidable defense against Internet intruders

By William Cheswick

Designer Estrogens

These compounds--also called SERMs-- have evolved from mere laboratory curiosities into drugs that hold promise for preventing several major disorders in women

By V. Craig Jordan

Cryptography for the Internet

E-mail and other information sent electronically are like digital postcards--they afford little privacy. Well-designed cryptography systems can ensure the secrecy of such transmissions

By Philip R. Zimmermann


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