Skip to main content

Features

How the Mind Emerges from the Brain's Complex Networks  
Neuroscience

How the Mind Emerges from the Brain's Complex Networks  

The new discipline of network neuroscience yields a picture of how mental activity arises from carefully orchestrated interactions among different brain areas

By Max Bertolero and Danielle S. Bassett
The World's First Virus-Proof Cell, with Redesigned DNA, Is About to Meet the Test of Its Life  
Biology

The World's First Virus-Proof Cell, with Redesigned DNA, Is About to Meet the Test of Its Life  

Biologists are building an organism that can shrug off any virus on the planet. Impervious human cells may be next

By Rowan Jacobsen
The Ecologists and the Mine
Environment

The Ecologists and the Mine

Mining giant Rio Tinto made a high-profile pledge to improve the ecology of its ilmenite sites in Madagascar in cooperation with conservation scientists. Then its bottom line began to suffer...

By Rowan Moore Gerety
One Small Step Back in Time
Space

One Small Step Back in Time

Half a century after Apollo 11, we remember how we achieved the impossible and why we need to do it again

By Clara Moskowitz
Mapping the Mission
Space

Mapping the Mission

Modern satellite imagery and 3-D modeling give us a new view of how Apollo 11 played out

By Edward Bell
The New Scramble for the Moon  
Space

The New Scramble for the Moon  

A new race could be heating up to claim valuable moon terrain amid uncertain laws

By Adam Mann
50 Years of Moon Missions: Graphic
Space

50 Years of Moon Missions: Graphic

All 122 attempts, visualized

By Set Reset
When Earth and the Moon Were One
Space

When Earth and the Moon Were One

An entirely new class of astronomical object—a synestia—may be the key to solving the lingering mysteries of lunar origin

By Simon J. Lock and Sarah T. Stewart
Apollo's Bounty: The Science of the Moon Rocks
Space

Apollo's Bounty: The Science of the Moon Rocks

The lunar rocks brought home by Apollo astronauts reshaped our understanding of the moon and the entire solar system. Gathering more of them is one of the most important reasons to go back...

By Erica Jawin
Come One, Come All: Building a Moon Village
Space

Come One, Come All: Building a Moon Village

Humanity first went to the moon to make a point. Now it’s time to overcome rivalries and pitch in together

By Clara Moskowitz

Departments

  • From the Editor

    A Symphony of Science

  • Letters

    Readers Respond to the March 2019 Issue

  • Advances

    The Not So Dead Sea: Traces of Ancient Bacteria Found in the Lake's Sediments

  • Millipede Genitalia Glow in Ultraviolet Light

  • Art Meets Science in These Dazzling Lamps Made of Microbes

  • A Head Full of Fluid and Burning Eyes: NASA Astronaut Talks about His Year Living in Space

  • Interactive IQ Test May Better Predict Real-World Achievement

  • As Predicted, Some of Australia's Turtles Are Going Extinct

  • What Happened to All of the Universe's Antimatter?

  • New Sensor Could Detect Electrical Failures in Ships or Buildings

  • In Case You Missed It

  • New Pacemaker Harvests Energy from the Heart

  • Forum

    Cannabis Could Help Solve the Opioid Crisis

  • The Science of Health

    Genomic Surveillance Could Make a Big Difference in the Fight against Malaria

  • The Science Agenda

    The U.S. Should Go Back to the Moon--but Not on Its Own

  • Recommended

    A Saturn V LEGO Set, a Moon Images Exhibit and New Science Books

  • Anti Gravity

    Jared Diamond's New Book Upheaval Looks at Lessons to Be Found from Countries in Crisis  

  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago

    1969: Catching Small Particles; 1919: Crashing Large Airplanes

  • Graphic Science

    Social Media Bots Deceive E-cigarette Users

  • The Intersection

    "Emotional AI" Might Sound Good, but It Could Have Some Troubling Consequences

  • Ventures

    We Should Be More Worried about Climate Change Than We Are about Nuclear Power

Purchase To Read More

Already purchased this issue? Sign In to Access
Select Format
Scroll To Top