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The Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider will be a particle accelerator of unprecedented energy and complexity, a global collaboration to uncover an exotic new layer of reality

By Chris Llewellyn Smith

The Asymmetry between Matter and Anti-Matter

New accelerators are searching for violations in a FUNDAMENTAL SYMMETRY OF NATURE, throwing open a window to physics beyond the known

By Helen R. Quinn and Michael S. Witherell

Quantum Teleportation

The science-fiction dream of "beaming" objects from place to place is now a reality--at least for particles of light

By Anton Zeilinger

Plenty of Room, Indeed

There is plenty of room for practical innovation at the nanoscale. But first, scientists have to understand the unique physics that governs matter there

By Michael Roukes

Frozen Light

Slowing a beam of light to a halt may pave the way for new optical communications technology, tabletop black holes and quantum computers

By Lene Vestergaard Hau

Extreme Light

Focusing light with the power of 1,000 HOOVER DAMS onto a point the size of A CELL NUCLEUS accelerates electrons to the speed of light in a femtosecond

By Donald Umstadter and Grard A. Mourou

Detecting Massive Neutrinos

A giant detector in the heart of Mount Ikenoyama in Japan has demonstrated that neutrinos metamorphose in flight, strongly suggesting that these ghostly particles have mass

By Edward Kearns, Takaaki Kajita and Yoji Totsuka

Black Holes and the Information Paradox

What happens to the information in matter destroyed by a black hole? Searching for that answer, physicists are groping toward a quantum theory of gravity

By Leonard Susskind

A Unified Physics by 2050?

Experiments at CERN and elsewhere should let us complete the Standard Model of particle physics, but a unified theory of all forces will probably require radically new ideas

By Steven Weinberg

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