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Why Is <em>Homo sapiens</em> the Sole Surviving Member of the Human Family?
Evolution

Why Is Homo sapiens the Sole Surviving Member of the Human Family?

Recent fossil, archaeological and genetic discoveries are revising the rise of our species

By Kate Wong
New Evidence Shows How Climate Shaped Human Evolution
Climate

New Evidence Shows How Climate Shaped Human Evolution

Swings between wet and dry landscapes pushed some of our ancestors toward modern traits—and killed off others

By Peter B. deMenocal
Ancient Stone Tools Force Rethinking of Human Origins
Evolution

Ancient Stone Tools Force Rethinking of Human Origins

Ancient stone tools from Kenya shatter the classic story of when and how humans became innovators

By Kate Wong
When the Sea Saved Humanity
Evolution

When the Sea Saved Humanity

Shortly after Homo sapiens arose, harsh climate conditions nearly extinguished our species. The small population that gave rise to all humans alive today may have survived by exploiting a unique combination of resources along the southern coast of Africa...

By Curtis W. Marean
Humans Evolved to Exercise  
Evolution

Humans Evolved to Exercise  

Unlike our ape cousins, humans require high levels of physical activity to be healthy

By Herman Pontzer
The Real Paleo Diet
Evolution

The Real Paleo Diet

Microscopic wear patterns on fossil teeth reveal what our ancestors ate—and provide insights into how climate change shaped human evolution

By Peter S. Ungar
Ingenious Method Reveals Precious Human Remains Hidden in Fossil "Junk"  
Evolution

Ingenious Method Reveals Precious Human Remains Hidden in Fossil "Junk"  

A new technique for identifying tiny fragments of fossilized bone is helping to answer key questions about when, where and how human species interacted with one another

By Thomas Higham and Katerina Douka
What Made Us Unique
Evolution

What Made Us Unique

How we became a different kind of animal

By Kevin Laland
The Cultural Origins of Language
Evolution

The Cultural Origins of Language

What makes language distinctly human

By Christine Kenneally
What Makes the Human Brain Special
Evolution

What Makes the Human Brain Special

Parts of the brain involved in language and cognition have enlarged greatly over an evolutionary timescale

By Chet C. Sherwood and Mesa Schumacher
The Origins of Human Morality
Evolution

The Origins of Human Morality

How we learned to put our fate in one another’s hands

By Michael Tomasello
The Naked Truth: Why Humans Have No Fur
Evolution

The Naked Truth: Why Humans Have No Fur

Recent findings lay bare the origins of human hairlessness—and hint that naked skin was a key factor in the emergence of other human traits

By Nina G. Jablonski
Ancient Cave Paintings Clinch the Case for Neandertal Symbolism
Evolution

Ancient Cave Paintings Clinch the Case for Neandertal Symbolism

Abstract images in Spanish caves date back 65,000 years—millennia before Homo sapiens set foot in Europe—settling a long-running debate over Neandertal cognition

By Kate Wong
Does Dancing Just Feel Good, or Did It Help Early Humans Survive?
Evolution

Does Dancing Just Feel Good, or Did It Help Early Humans Survive?

Do humans dance just for fun, or did it help our ancestors survive thousands of years ago?

By Thea Singer
Artificial Intelligence Will Serve Humans, Not Enslave Them
Engineering

Artificial Intelligence Will Serve Humans, Not Enslave Them

AI will serve our species, not control it

By Pedro Domingos
Humans Are Still Evolving
Evolution

Humans Are Still Evolving

For 30,000 years our species has been changing remarkably quickly. And we're not done yet

By John Hawks
An Evolutionary Biologist Imagines the Future Traits of Space Colonists
Space

An Evolutionary Biologist Imagines the Future Traits of Space Colonists

How will future generations make the voyage from our earthly home to the planets and beyond—and what will that mean for our species?

By Cameron M. Smith
Monogamy May Be Written in Our Genes
Biology

Monogamy May Be Written in Our Genes

In animal studies, a set of 42 genes involved in neural development, learning and memory, and cognition seems to be associated with monogamy

By Karen Hopkin

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    Humanity's Journey

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