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Neurological Health1112 articles archived since 1845

Childhood Stress Decreases Size of Brain Regions

Children who experience neglect, abuse and/or poverty can have smaller amygdalas and hippocampuses, brain regions involved in emotion and memory, compared with kids raised in nurturing environments...

August 16, 2014 — Christie Nicholson

Beyond Classic Brain Illustrations That Make Us Drool

I threw down a bit of a challenge last month at the Association of Medical Illustrators Conference in Minnesota. But first, I had to—somewhat unexpectedly—accept some challenges presented by others...

August 13, 2014 — Jen Christiansen

Robin Williams' Comedic Genius Was Not a Result of Mental Illness, but His Suicide Was

Of course, the media is writing a lot today about the link between mental illness and creativity in light of Robin Williams' suicide. Here's the thing: Williams' comedic genius was a result of many factors, including his compassion, playfulness, divergent thinking, imagination, intelligence, affective repertoire, and unique life experiences...

August 12, 2014 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Unveiling the Real Evil Genius

Unveiling the Real Evil Genius

Creative people are better at rationalizing small ethical lapses that can spiral out of control

August 1, 2014 — Ingrid Wickelgren

Lucy Film Hinges on Brain Capacity Myth

On July 25, French film writer/director Luc Besson's action thriller Lucy opens in theaters nationwide. The premise is that the title character, played by Scarlett Johansson, is exposed to a drug that unlocks her mind, giving her superhuman powers of cognition...

July 25, 2014 — Kate Wong

Music Might Boost Self-Awareness in Alzheimer's Patients

Many studies have found that familiar songs enhance mood, relieve stress and reduce anxiety in patients with Alzheimer's, perhaps because musical memory is often spared even when a patient has declined to a low level of cognition...

July 22, 2014 — Duncan Van Horn

Heavy Metal Headbanging Rare Risk Revealed

Headbanging can cause pain or even whiplash. But a 50-year-old Motörhead fan developed a more serious condition, bleeding in the brain that required surgical repair, after headbanging at a concert...

July 14, 2014 — Dina Fine Maron
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