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Neurological Health1134 articles archived since 1845

Watching Brain Cells in Action

A new research tool using light allows scientists to watch individual brain cells react in real time. Christie Nicholson reports

May 6, 2010

Mothers' Depression Can Go Well Beyond Children's Infancy

Many mothers continue to have depressive symptoms well into their child's youth, which can have lasting impacts on their children's development, but new research shows short therapy sessions can improve outlook...

May 5, 2010 — Katherine Harmon

How the immune system's T cells seem to improve learning

The immune system's cells work hard to fight off infections. But new research is uncovering their important role in cognition, and a study published online May 3 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine reveals how the immune system's T cells, which aren't present in the brain, can impact learning and memory...

May 3, 2010 — Katherine Harmon

Brain Makeover

A short therapy session remodels the brains of people with a muscle-control disorder

April 23, 2010 — Michele Solis

Blindsight: Seeing without Knowing It

Is it possible to see something without knowing you can see it? Maybe that's not so hard to imagine if you think of subliminal images flashed for a frame or two on a movie screen—too quickly for you to see consciously but perhaps long enough to add a frisson of fear...

April 22, 2010 — Graham P. Collins
Can the Peace Drug Help Clean Up the War Mess?

Can the Peace Drug Help Clean Up the War Mess?

At a conference last weekend, researchers reported positive results on the effectiveness of MDMA in relieving PTSD and talked about psilocybin in reducing stress in late-stage cancer patients...

April 20, 2010 — Brian Vastag

DMT is in your head, but it may be too weird for the psychedelic renaissance

You know that psychedelics are making a comeback when the New York Times says so on page 1. In “Hallucinogens Have Doctors Tuning In,” John Tierney reports on how doctors at schools like Harvard, Johns Hopkins, UCLA and NYU are testing the potential of psilocybin and other hallucinogens for treating depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism—and for inducing spiritual experiences.  Tierney’s brisk overview neglects to mention the most mind-bending of all psychedelics: dimethyltryptamine, or DMT...

April 16, 2010 — John Horgan
Williams Syndrome Kids Show No Racial Bias

Williams Syndrome Kids Show No Racial Bias

Kids with the genetic condition called Williams syndrome have no social anxiety and are highly gregarious--and also exhibit no racial bias in standard social-bias experiments. Adam Hinterthuer reports...

April 13, 2010

Faulty Circuits

Neuroscience is revealing the malfunctioning connections underlying psychological disorders and forcing psychiatrists to rethink the causes of mental illness

April 5, 2010 — Thomas R. Insel
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