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George M. Church

George Church is Professor at Harvard & MIT, co-author of 450 papers, 95 patent publications & the book Regenesis.…read more

George Church is Professor at Harvard & MIT, co-author of 450 papers, 95 patent publications & the book Regenesis. He developed methods used for the first genome sequence (1994) & genome recoding & million-fold cost reductions since.  He co-initiated the BRAIN Initiative (2011) & Genome Projects (1984, 2005) to provide & interpret world's only open-access personal precision medicine data.

Rita Colwell

Dr. Rita R. Colwell is Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and Chairman and Chief Science Officer, CosmosID, Inc.…read more

Dr. Rita R. Colwell is Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and Chairman and Chief Science Officer, CosmosID, Inc.  Her interests are focused on genomics, biodiversity, and molecular microbial systematics and ecology.  Dr. Colwell is an honorary member of the microbiological societies of the UK, Australia, France, Israel, Bangladesh, India and the U.S. Dr. Colwell served as the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004.  She has authored/co-authored 19 books and over 800 scientific publications.  She is a member of the National Academy of Science and has been awarded the Stockholm Water Prize, Order of the Rising Sun, Japan, and the US National Medal of Science.

Drew Endy

Drew Endy is a Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University and President of the BioBricks Foundation.  He research teams have pioneered amplifying genetic logic gates, rewritable DNA data storage, reliably reuseable standard biological parts, and the refactoring of genomes.  Drew helped launch the new undergraduate majors in biological engineering at both MIT and Stanford; he also co-founded the iGEM competition, a global genetic engineering “olympics” that now engages over 6,000 students annually.  Drew has been recognized by the White House for his work on open source biotechnology and, most recently, received an honorary doctorate from the Technische Universiteit Delft.  He is a voting member of the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity and the World Health Organization's Smallpox Advisory Committee.  He lives in Menlo Park California with his wife and colleague Professor Christina Smolke.…read more

Drew Endy is a Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University and President of the BioBricks Foundation.  He research teams have pioneered amplifying genetic logic gates, rewritable DNA data storage, reliably reuseable standard biological parts, and the refactoring of genomes.  Drew helped launch the new undergraduate majors in biological engineering at both MIT and Stanford; he also co-founded the iGEM competition, a global genetic engineering “olympics” that now engages over 6,000 students annually.  Drew has been recognized by the White House for his work on open source biotechnology and, most recently, received an honorary doctorate from the Technische Universiteit Delft.  He is a voting member of the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity and the World Health Organization's Smallpox Advisory Committee.  He lives in Menlo Park California with his wife and colleague Professor Christina Smolke.

Ed Felten

Edward W. Felten is the Robert E. Kahn Professor of  Computer Science  and  Public Affairs , and the founding Director of Princeton's  Center for Information Technology Policy .…read more

Edward W. Felten is the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, and the founding Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy. In 2015-2017 he served in the White House as Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer. In 2011-12 he served as the first Chief Technologist at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. His research interests include computer security and privacy, and technology law and policy. He has published more than 100 papers in the research literature, and two books. His research on topics such as Internet security, privacy, copyright and copy protection, and electronic voting has been covered extensively in the popular press.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the ACM. He has testified before the House and Senate committee hearings on privacy, electronic voting, and digital television. In 2004, Scientific American magazine named him to its list of fifty worldwide science and technology leaders.

Jonathan Foley

JONATHAN FOLEY, PHD
Dr. Jonathan Foley is the Executive Director of Project Drawdown, the world’s leading source of science-based climate solutions.…read more

JONATHAN FOLEY, PHD
Dr. Jonathan Foley is the Executive Director of Project Drawdown, the world’s leading source of science-based climate solutions. A world-renowned scientist, his work focuses on the sustainability of our planet and the climate, ecosystems and natural resources we depend on. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to our understanding of worldwide changes in climate, ecosystems and global food systems. Foley has won numerous awards and honors, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (awarded by President Bill Clinton); the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Award; the J.S. McDonnell Foundation's 21st Century Science Award; an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellowship; and the Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. In 2014, he was named winner of the prestigious Heinz Award for the Environment. A noted science communicator, Foley has written many popular articles, op-eds, and essays in publications like National Geographic, Scientific American, the New York Times, The Guardian, Ensia, Yale's Environment 360, and bioGraphic, among others. His presentations on global environmental issues have been featured at hundreds of venues, including the Aspen Environmental Forum, the Chautauqua Institution, and TED.

Kaigham J. Gabriel

Ken Gabriel is the President and CEO of The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., an independent not-for-profit research institution that develops innovative solutions to some of the nation’s most critical problems in national security, space, biomedical systems and energy.…read more

Ken Gabriel is the President and CEO of The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., an independent not-for-profit research institution that develops innovative solutions to some of the nation’s most critical problems in national security, space, biomedical systems and energy.

Ken was most recently the deputy director of the Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) group at Google, which he helped establish when he joined the organization in 2012 as Corporate Vice President at Google/Motorola Mobility. From 2009 to 2012, Ken was the Deputy Director, and then Acting Director, of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in the Department of Defense, an agency with an annual budget of $3B leading projects to both create and avoid technology surprise.

Widely regarded as the architect of the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) industry, Gabriel was the Co-Founder, Chairman and Chief Technology Officer of Akustica, a fabless semiconductor company that commercialized MEMS audio devices and sensors between 2002 and 2009, the year it was acquired.

Ken has been a tenured professor in both the Robotics Institute and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds SM and ScD degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Harold "Skip" Garner

Skip received his BS in Nuclear Engineering, a Ph.D. in plasma physics and holds an honorary professional engineering degree.…read more

Skip received his BS in Nuclear Engineering, a Ph.D. in plasma physics and holds an honorary professional engineering degree.

Skip worked for 12 years at General Atomics in La Jolla, California, where he conducted experimental and theoretical research at international fusion research facilities. He was a founding member of “The Institute”, an internal think tank.

From 1994 to 2009, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Skip held the P. O’B. Montgomery, M.D., Distinguished Chair, was a Professor of Biochemistry and Internal Medicine. 

In 2009, Skip moved to Virginia Tech, where he is the Executive Director, office of Medical Informatics, Translation, Training and Ethics (MITTE), and a Professor of Medicine at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine.

In 2016, Skip also became a Professor of Biomedicine, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM), Executive Director, Primary Care Research Network and The Center for Bioinformatics and Genetics.  He is a Senior Research Member of the Gibbs Cancer Center.

He sits on numerous corporate advisory boards and advises for numerous governmental agencies. He is also the founder of several companies - Helix, BioAutomation, Light Biology (sold to Nimblegen, acquired by Roche), Orbit Genomics (previously Genomeon), Heliotext, Quanta Lingua and Comperity.

Michael Gazzaniga

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the Director of the Sage Center for the study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.…read more

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the Director of the Sage Center for the study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received a Ph.D from the California Institute of Technology in 1964/65, where he worked with Roger Sperry, and had primary responsibility for initiating human split-brain research. He has carried out extensive studies on both sub-human primate and human behavior and cognition.  He has established Centers for Cognitive Neuroscience at Cornell Medical School and Dartmouth College and the Center for Neuroscience at UC, Davis. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience and also a founder of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society.  For 20 years he directed the Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience and serves as Editor-in-Chief of the major reference text, The Cognitive Neurosciences. He was a member of the President's Council on Bioethics from 2001-2009.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences.  

Lene Vestergaard Hau
Christof Koch

Christof Koch is an American neuroscientist best known for his studies and writings exploring the basis of consciousness.…read more

Christof Koch is an American neuroscientist best known for his studies and writings exploring the basis of consciousness. Trained as a physicist, Koch was for 27 years a professor of biology and engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He is now President and Chief Scientific Officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, leading a ten year, large-scale, high through-put effort to build brain observatories to map, analyze and understand the mouse and human cerebral cortex.

On a quest to understand the physical roots of consciousness before his brain stops functioning, he published his first paper on the neural correlates of consciousness with the molecular biologist Francis Crick a quarter of a century ago.

He is a frequent public speaker and writes a regular column for Scientific American Mind. Christof is a vegetarian who lives in Seattle and loves big dogs, climbing, rowing, and biking.

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