Skip to main content

    Advanced Search

      Your search found 952 results

      • RelevanceSort by
      • AllFilter By
      • All Since 1845All Since 1845
      May 9, 2011Mind & Brain

      Too Hard for Science? Simulating the Human Brain

      Supercomputers may soon approach the brain's power, but much is unknown about how it works In "Too Hard for Science?" I interview scientists about ideas they would love to explore that they don't think could be investigated...
      April 18, 1868The Sciences

      Useless Speculations

      April 1, 2006Mind & Brain

      Ask the Brains

      August 2, 2011Mind & Brain

      Too Hard For Science? Are There Drugs That Kill Love?

      Antidepressants might lift up one's spirits, but might they break hearts? In "Too Hard For Science?" I interview scientists about ideas they would love to explore that they don't think could be investigated...
      June 1, 1990Mind & Brain

      Overview: Schizophrenia

      This devastating illness remains profoundly mysterious
      November 1, 2010Mind & Brain

      Readers Respond to "Speaking in Tones"-- And More...

      Letters to the editor about the July/August 2010 issue of Scientific American MIND
      July 30, 1859The Sciences

      Civilized Plagiarism

      November 5, 2021Autism

      Coming Out Autistic

      Transgender or gender-fluid people are more likely to be neurodivergent, and vice versa. Here’s what that’s like
      July 17, 1909The Sciences

      Notes and Queries - July 17, 1909

      January 1, 2012Mind & Brain

      Ask the Brains

      October 20, 1917The Sciences

      German Engineering from Within

      August 4, 2011Biology

      Four Things Most People Get Wrong about Memory

      Human memory has been shown again and again to be far from perfect. We overlook big things, forget details, conflate events. One famous experiment even demonstrated that many people asked to watch a video of people playing basketball failed to notice a person wearing a gorilla suit walk right through the middle of the scene.So why does eyewitness testimony continue to hold water in courtrooms?...
      January 12, 2009Health

      Can a good night's sleep prevent a cold?



      People who get less than seven hours of shut-eye nightly are three times more likely to catch a cold than those who get eight or more hours, according to a new study.
      Scroll To Top