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      His Brain, Her Brain

      Boy or girl? Even before a person is born, that’s the first thing everyone wants to know—underscoring just how much value humans place on gender. In this eBook, we take a closer look at the anatomical, chemical and functional differences in the brains of men and women—as well as some surprising similarities. 

      * Editor’s note: Special Edition was published as His Brain, Her Brain.
      $6.99
      His Brain, Her Brain
      November 9, 2007The Sciences

      Researchers Sniff Out Brain Sex Differences

      Microscopic roundworms are attracted to the smells of different foods depending on whether or not they have male brains. Researchers hope that understanding such characteristics could lead to insights about why humans have sex-related risk differences for certain psychological conditions, such as autism and depression...
      June 9, 2010

      Babies born early--even by a week--are more likely to have special education needs

      Premature infants have a known higher risk for poor neurological development, often leading to developmental and educational issues. However, these babies, born before 37 weeks, make up a small number of any generation, and new research shows that the 40 percent of babies born any more than a week before a full 40-week term are also at higher risk for having special education needs during childhood...
      July 1, 2015Mind & Brain

      July/August 2015 Scientific American Mind News Ticker

      False memories in mice, a health gap between rich and poor kids, and medicated ADHD kids made the news recently
      January 1, 2014Mind & Brain

      Switching on Creativity

      The extraordinary abilities of savants have inspired a brain-stimulation technique for enabling creative insight
      February 1, 2008Mind & Brain

      'Til Death Do Us Part

      Monogamous monkeys reveal the brain circuits of pair bonding
      September 1, 2006The Sciences

      Brief Points, September 2006

      July 1, 2013The Sciences

      Recommended: Thinking in Numbers

      Books and recommendations from Scientific American
      August 25, 2008

      CDC measles expert weighs in on vaccinations, so does Amanda Peet

      Last week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that the U.S. has seen more cases of measles than at any time since 1996 in the last six months—and its stories like that that have caught the attention of actress Amanda Peet, among others concerned about the resurgence...
      January 7, 2009

      "Love hormone" may also help us recognize faces

      Oxytocin, a hormone associated with trust and social bonding, also helps people recognize familiar human faces, according to a new study. Researchers say the findings, published today in The Journal of Neuroscience , could shed light on the causes of mysterious neurological and psychological disorders...
      October 14, 2009Health

      Celeb Vaccine Wars: Peet Beats Maher

      Comedian Bill Maher advises against vaccinations. But actress Amanda Peet--and Dr. Bill Frist--have it right: vaccines are good. Steve Mirsky comments
      December 20, 2012

      Patients Reflect on Life with a Common Brain Malformation

      At least 1 in 4000 infants is born without a corpus callosum. This powerful body of connective white matter serves as the primary bridge between the brain's hemispheres, allowing us to rapidly integrate complex information."It's a hidden disability," says University of California Institute of Technology psychologist Lynn Paul...
      October 27, 2008

      Palin takes on fruit flies--And loses

      Amid the hoopla about Sarah Palin's very un-hockey mom $150,000 campaign wardrobe, the Republican veep candidate managed to drop another flammable tidbit that set off the science community,
      not to mention the blogosphere.During a speech on her ticket's special needs policy last week, Palin, who has held up her Down's syndrome young son as a symbol of her kinship with all parents of special needs children, mocked earmarks better known as pork for eating up much-needed federal funds...
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