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Neurons for Good and Bad Surprises

A recent study with monkeys finds that the amygdala, the emotional center of the brain, has neurons that fire for good surprises, and different neurons that fire for bad surprises.

September 20, 2007

How We Process Horrible Sounds

Researchers develop a model for how we find certain sounds, like nails on a chalkboard, unbearable. Christie Nicholson reports

October 26, 2012

The Stress of Crowds

City dwellers may handle pressure differently from those who live in less populated areas

September 1, 2011 — Alla Katsnelson

Spooky music is spookier with your eyes closed

It’s Halloween. You’re listening to some creepy, scary music. Maybe it sounds like something like this* – SCARY! You are lying still, attending to the emotional qualities of the music.

October 31, 2013 — Princess Ojiaku
What Is “Ironic Science”?

What Is “Ironic Science”?

I was scanning my Twitter feed recently, pretending to look for “news” while really searching, as usual, for items that praise, condemn or merely allude to me—I mean, let’s face it, all of us social-media addicts are narcissists–when the bells in my amygdala started clanging.

January 16, 2015 — John Horgan

Friend or Foe?

How we instantly size up people has little to do with logic and a lot to do with looks

April 1, 2005 — Marion Sonnenmoser

Fascinated by Fear

Researchers get a rare glimpse at life without fright

May 1, 2011 — Joe Kloc

Emotion, Memory and the Brain

The neural routes underlying the formation of memories about primitive emotional experiences, such as fear, have been traced

April 1, 2002 — Joseph E. LeDoux

Mastery of Emotions

Joseph E. LeDoux discovered how fear arises. Now he is showing that the biology of emotions is what gives life meaning

February 1, 2006 — David Dobbs

Abuse and Attachment

A stifled fear response may explain why young victims stand by their abusers

March 1, 2010 — Erica Westly