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The Edge’s Annual Question: The Way We Produce and Advance Science

The Edge’s Annual Question: The Way We Produce and Advance Science

This year, I was invited to contribute to the Edge Foundation’s Annual Question. Other contributor include Helen Fisher, Irene Pepperberg, Alan Alda, Nina Jablonski, Jay Rosen, and, well 150 others: http://www.edge.org/responses/what-scientific-idea-is-ready-for-retirement The question was, “What scientific idea is ready for retirement?” My contribution: The Way We Produce And Advance Science Last year, I spearheaded a [...]..

January 14, 2014 — Kate Clancy

Share This: Chain Letters and Social Networks

Chain letters hit the right chord of shock, or trigger the right degree of anxiety, which prompts the reader to share the stories or information they contain. To this end, chain letters are actually really well suited to social media because so little effort on the part of the reader is required to pass them on...

February 4, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
Dead Crickets Cannot Sing at All: A Paleofantastical Review

Dead Crickets Cannot Sing at All: A Paleofantastical Review

“The first thing you have to do to study 4,000-year-old DNA is take off your clothes.” Marlene Zuk’s new book Paleofantasy: What Evolution Really Tells Us About Sex, Diet, and How We Live begins in classic science-writer style...

October 28, 2013 — Kate Clancy
“Rethinking Home” with Citizen Anthropologists

“Rethinking Home” with Citizen Anthropologists

There is something to be said for having a space that you call home. It grounds you in social and cultural ways. As much as your home is a reflection of who you are, it also becomes a mirror for larger social observances...

July 15, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
Beware Attack Troll: Share Your Most Notable

Beware Attack Troll: Share Your Most Notable

Trigger warning for graphic description of internet harassment. * * * We science writers all have our favorite troll comments. For me, they are the ones that claim I don’t know my topic, that tell me what I should have written, that criticize my tone rather than my content...

November 11, 2013 — Kate Clancy

The Obligation of Gifts

For those of you with Christmas trees, they probably look a little barren following the unwrapping of presents. What did you get for Christmas?

December 26, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa

Piltdown Man Came from The Lost World... Well, No, It Didn't

In 1908, amateur geologist and solicitor Charles Dawson claimed the discovery of a new and exciting fossil that, so it was thought, shed substantial light on the ancestry of humans. Dubbed Piltdown man, and technically named  Eoanthropus dawsoni , it was (...  spoiler ...) eventually shown to be a hoax – one of the most nefarious, infamous and successful scientific hoaxes of all time.You know all of this already...

October 9, 2015 — Darren Naish

Piltdown Man and the Dualist Contention

One of the most fascinating episodes in the history of palaeontology is that of Piltdown man, an alleged human ancestor discovered in 1908 at Piltdown in Sussex, England. Formally named  Eoanthropus dawsoni  in 1912, Piltdown man matched early 20 th  century expectations of what a human ancestor might be like...

October 3, 2015
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End of Summer Sale

End of Summer Sale