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Ancient Sculpture Garden Was Built by Neandertals

In a cave in France archaeologists have found some of the oldest human constructions ever discovered — but no one knows what they are. Nature Video takes a look. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on May 25, 2016...

May 27, 2016 — Nature Video

When Art Falls Apart

As plastic used in modern art degrades, scientists turn to nanotechnology to put it back together

April 1, 2016 — Josh Fischman

Graphene Kirigami

Nature Video finds out how the Japanese art of paper-cutting can give 'supermaterial' graphene even more incredible properties. This article was reproduced with permission and was first published on July 29, 2015...

July 29, 2015 — Nature Video

Shades of Sensitivity

The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally, inhumanly sensitive. To him… a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstasy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a god, and failure is death...

May 4, 2015 — Scott Barry Kaufman

A Meeting of Art and Science

Art and science are usually held up as two opposing disciplines. However, arguably very similar abilities are needed to be an artist and a scientist: an ability to observe the world in detail, to perhaps notice things that other people don't, to creatively come up with ideas and to draw novel connections...

May 3, 2015 — Felicity Muth

Picasso: X-Rays Reveal the Master’s Materials

Every field has its raging debates among impassioned experts, and the art world is no exception. Case in point: some art historians long suspected that master painter Pablo Picasso used common house paint rather than the oil paints traditionally used in his era, which would make him the first known artist to do so...

March 18, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette

The Amazing Art of Biologist Ernst Haeckel

If you’re like me, you’ve always wanted Ernst Haeckel in your house. Well, not literally Ernst Haeckel, the great 19th century biologist (although that would be cool, in alive form)...

March 12, 2015 — Jennifer Frazer
Join the #SciArt Tweetstorm!

Join the #SciArt Tweetstorm!

Credit: Illustration by Glendon Mellow Source: Help Us Start a SciArt Tweet Storm by Glendon Mellow on Symbiartic This week, Glendon Mellow at Symbiartic has initiated a #sciart tweetstorm, and the sheer quantity of scienceart being shared is spectacular...

March 2, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Art Takes on Science: An Experiment in ScienceArt & Blogging

Art Takes on Science: An Experiment in ScienceArt & Blogging

This July, Symbiartic will celebrate its 4th birthday along with the entire Scientific American Blog Network. To date, we have featured more than 230 science artists in over 460 posts as the field continues to expand and come into its own...

February 20, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

I met my first savant 52 years ago and have been intrigued with that remarkable condition ever since. One of the most striking and consistent things in the many savants I have seen is that that they clearly know things they never learned...

January 28, 2015 — Darold Treffert
Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

Genetic Memory: How We Know Things We Never Learned

I met my first savant 52 years ago and have been intrigued with that remarkable condition ever since. One of the most striking and consistent things in the many savants I have seen is that that they clearly know things they never learned...

January 28, 2015 — Darold Treffert
Math Is Beautiful, But Is It Art?

Math Is Beautiful, But Is It Art?

Every so often, beauty comes up as a topic of conversation in editorial meetings at Scientific American. Surely there’s an article, or series of articles that we can develop on the topic?...

January 27, 2015 — Jen Christiansen
An Intricate 3D-Printed Dress, No Assembly Required

An Intricate 3D-Printed Dress, No Assembly Required

One of the most inspired design studios working at the intersection of science, art, and technology today is Nervous System, a Massachusetts-based team led by Jessica Rosenkrantz and Jesse Louis-Rosenberg...

January 25, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios

The Murals of Scientific American Founder Rufus Porter

Perhaps the tweet below from editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina last weekend shouldn’t have been a surprise. After all, I knew that Rufus Porter, founding editor and publisher of Scientific American, was a well-rounded fellow...

January 23, 2015 — Jen Christiansen

Science and Art Exhibits To Launch 2015

The number of exhibits combining science and art in some capacity has grown steadily since I began blogging about them in 2011. With exhibits in galleries and museums across the country, there’s something for everyone...

January 12, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios
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