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"development"

Dear Beverage Industry: Yes, 12-Year-Olds Are Children.

Dear Beverage Industry: Yes, 12-Year-Olds Are Children.

The Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity (full disclosure: I work for them) just released the Sugary Drink Facts Report, exhaustively detailing the nutrition of products offered by the beverage industry, and how the industry markets them.

November 21, 2014 — Patrick Mustain

Intelligence, Cancer, and Eyjafjallaj

This seems to have become unofficial volcano week, here at ScienceBlogs. If you haven’t been following the coverage of the Eyjafjallaj

April 21, 2010 — Jason G. Goldman

Is It Good For Kids To Have A Pet?

People overwhelmingly believe that having pets is overall a good thing for children. Indeed, a 2003 paper by developmental psychologist Gail F.

April 17, 2014 — Jason G. Goldman

U.S. Falling Behind on Competitiveness and Innovation

I’ve been mentioning R&D in talks and articles a lot lately. Most audiences outside the beltway don’t immediately know I mean Research and Development – until I explain it’s the part of our federal budget accounting for a good deal of “science stuff.” R&D supports basic research and leads to new innovation while helping boost [...]

November 12, 2014 — Sheril Kirshenbaum
For the Holidays: Gingerbread Zoning Suggestions

For the Holidays: Gingerbread Zoning Suggestions

The obvious strain on gingerbread houses, jelleybean-and-honey fastening products, and other sugar-based infrastructure systems brings them to our attention during the holiday season.

December 24, 2013 — Scott Huler

Teens These Days, Always Changing Their Gray Matter

While we all may vary on just how much time we like spending with other people, humans are overall very social beings. Scientists have already found this to be reflected in our health and well-being - with social isolation being associated with more depression, worse health, and a shorter life.

February 3, 2015 — Amanda Baker
The Checklist Manifesto Meets Clinical Trials–SPIRIT13

The Checklist Manifesto Meets Clinical Trials–SPIRIT13

ClinicalTrials.gov Atul Gawande has made human lapses more understandable, if not acceptable, reminding us that “We miss stuff. We are inconsistent and unreliable because of the complexity of care,” and making the idea of checklists mainstream, rather than a prop for failing memories.

October 8, 2013 — Judy Stone
What do you need to know to survive this years flu?

What do you need to know to survive this years flu?

I spent a year filtering spit and nasal washings, growing influenza in tissue cultures in a minimalist lab, and trying to develop an oral flu vaccine, all as part of my Infectious Diseases fellowship thirty years ago.

January 8, 2014 — Judy Stone

Baby Prep School: A Brain Game Or A Mama’s Coo-Cooing?

Baby’s first robot If  you could only learn a language with the innocent receptivity of a young child. That adage, repeated ad nauseam, once an adult has decided to learn French or Tagalog engenders endless debate.

October 24, 2014 — Gary Stix
A Modest Mussel Is Making Waves

A Modest Mussel Is Making Waves

Image: A mussel shell engraved by Homo erectus between 540,000 and 430,000 years ago Credit: Wim Lustenhouwer, VU University Amsterdam Source: Kate Wong’s World’s Oldest Engraving Upends Theory of Homo sapiens Uniqueness on Observations These scratches may not look like much but they predate the existence of our species, Homo sapiens, and upend any claim [...]

December 10, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios