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Breaking Food Down

Breaking Food Down

What is food? The Merriam-Webster Dictionary entry says “Something that nourishes, sustains, or supplies.” How beautiful. That statement captures much of the emotion and feeling surrounding food, yet it’s only part of the full definition...

September 4, 2013 — See Arr Oh
The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

The Private Life of Plankton — in HD

Artistic, black and white photos of plankton — as we saw last time — are fabulous. But what if one hungers for HD? The Plankton Chronicles have got you covered.

September 29, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer
How Much Nature Do We Have to Use?

How Much Nature Do We Have to Use?

Its so easy to slip into debt, but so hard to dig oneself out. Just ask the typical wage earnereven business and national leaders. People who know better still wait for that next paycheck, assumed pay raise or small miracle to help them catch up...

December 12, 2013 — Mathis Wackernagel
There Are Plenty of Octopuses In the Sea—Or Are There?

There Are Plenty of Octopuses In the Sea—Or Are There?

First a moment to celebrate Octopus Chronicles‘ 100th post! Little could I have imagined when I started this blog in November 2011 that there would be so much amazing octopus research to cover—and so many wonderful readers...

December 27, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle is a Glamour Woman of the Year

Her Deepness. The Sturgeon General. And now: Glamour Girl. On Monday night, renowned oceanographer Sylvia Earle earned a new moniker when she joined eight others in receiving a 2014 Glamour Woman of the Year Award at a celebrity-packed Carnegie Hall...

November 14, 2014 — Maia Weinstock

Policing Seafood with DNA

A federal task force should look seriously at investing in genomic methods that allow the simultaneous study of multiple genes

August 19, 2015 — Ben Shouse and Scott Baker
The ‘ghosts’ of extinct birds in modern ecosystems

The ‘ghosts’ of extinct birds in modern ecosystems

It needs to be better appreciated that the vast majority of modern ecosystems and communities are broken or, at least, very much incomplete compared to the situation present within very recent geological history: they lack an often significant number of key component species including some, many or all of the so-called keystone species...

December 13, 2013 — Darren Naish

First Octopus Farms Get Growing

Fish farms now produce million tons of fish each year around the globe. But octopuses have largely escaped this kind of confined aquaculturing, despite a growing global demand and overfishing...

September 24, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage
The Crossroads of Evolution and Ecology

The Crossroads of Evolution and Ecology

Penicillium makes Penicillin by Ryan Somma of Ideonexus. About EvoEcoLab Natural history is about observation and long, deep thinking. The best natural scientists have spent lots of time thinking about what they are witness to...

July 5, 2011 — Kevin Zelnio

"Gene Drives" And CRISPR Could Revolutionize Ecosystem Management

A note from the authors: With this guest blog post we want to share the key features of an innovative method for the high-precision genome editing of wild populations that has been outlined by our team at the Wyss Institute, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health...

July 17, 2014 — Kevin Esvelt, George Church and Jeantine Lunshof
Scientists Explore New Zealand’s Deep Sea (Part I)

Scientists Explore New Zealand’s Deep Sea (Part I)

The JAMSTEC research vessel RV Yokosuka sailed from Nuku’alofa in Tonga this morning, heading towards New Zealand to explore the animal life on deep undersea mountains, or seamounts.

November 25, 2013 — Malcolm Clark and Shinji Tsuchida
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End of Summer Sale

End of Summer Sale