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Once Extinct in the Wild, Galapagos Giant Tortoises Return to Pinzon Island

Once Extinct in the Wild, Galapagos Giant Tortoises Return to Pinzon Island

Now here’s a great conservation success story: After more than 100 years, Galápagos giant tortoise hatchlings finally have a chance to thrive and survive on their native Pinzón Island, after conservationists cleared it of the invasive rats that nearly wiped out the animals...

August 2, 2013 — John R. Platt
The Flea

The Flea

Image of the Week #102, July 31st, 2013: From: How the Fleas’ Next of Kin Ended up Living on a Liverwort in Alaska by Jennifer Frazer at The Artful Amoeba.

July 31, 2013 — Bora Zivkovic

Lavasoa Dwarf Lemur is Cuddly and New

Look at this soft, fluffy bundle of newness. This little man is the Lavasoa dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus lavasoensis), a newly described species of dwarf lemur from southern Madagascar.

July 31, 2013 — Becky Crew

Conservation Concerns for South America's Remarkable Endemic Dogs

Last year the Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia volume titled Extinct Life appeared in print. I was asked to cover South American mammals, perhaps because they wanted me to write about borhyaenoids, toxodonts, litopterns, astrapotheres and so on (some of which have been covered on Tet Zoo in the past - I really need to get back [...]..

October 27, 2014 — Darren Naish
Culture Dish: Promoting Diversity in Science Writing

Culture Dish: Promoting Diversity in Science Writing

The most persistent — and infuriating — question about diversity in science writing has to be: "Why do we need diversity?" Sometimes that question is followed by this: "Isn't science color-blind?" To answer that second question first — no, science is most definitely not color-blind, any more than history or politics or literature is color-blind...

October 15, 2014 — Apoorva Mandavilli & Nidhi Subbaraman
A Paper Puppet Homage to Microbes

A Paper Puppet Homage to Microbes

The amazing power duo of Flora Lichtman and Sharon Shattuck (Sweet Fern Productions) has come out with a new animated short on the discovery of microbes.

November 23, 2014 — Carin Bondar

Are Scientists on the Cusp of Knowing How Weird We Are?

I’m writing this post for two reasons. One is to recommend a new book by Columbia astrobiologist Caleb Scharf (who also writes a terrific Scientific American blog, “Life, Unbounded“), and the other is to defend an old book of mine...

November 21, 2014 — John Horgan

Close, Peaceful Whale Encounters Captured on Video

I came across these incredible videos by John J. King II (AleutianDream on YouTube) and I just had to share them. These snorkelers are in such close and peaceful contact with wild humpbacks and sperm whales in waters near the Dominican Republic, and Dominica respectively...

November 18, 2014 — Carin Bondar
Generation Open: Sneak Peek Into Science’s Future at OpenCon 2014

Generation Open: Sneak Peek Into Science’s Future at OpenCon 2014

“What is your generation going to do? You don’t have a choice. You will make a mark. Will it be the mark of apathy? Or will you make the internet what it could be?” Michael Carroll is a Professor of Law and one of the founders of the Creative Commons...

November 16, 2014 — Hilda Bastian
`Strange bedfellow frogs' (part I): rotund, adorable brevicipitids

`Strange bedfellow frogs' (part I): rotund, adorable brevicipitids

Suddenly and unexpectedly, I have the urge to write about frogs. Today we look briefly at the first of two behaviourally peculiar, anatomically surprising groups, both of which are endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, both of which belong to a major neobatrachian frog clade called Allodapanura, and both of which have been united in a clade [...]..

January 13, 2015 — Darren Naish

Giving Birth To A Tropical Parasite [Video Not For The Squeamish]

“Why is it that an animal that is actively trying to kill us, such as a lion, gets more respect than one that is only trying to nibble on us a little, without causing much harm?” -Piotr Naskrecki Biologist Piotr Naskrecki, who traveled with me to Belize last year, returned home to find himself incubating [...]..

January 12, 2015 — Alex Wild

That Comet? That's You, 4.5 Billion Years Ago

As the European Space Agency’s Philae lander bounced and settled onto the surface of comet 67P/C-G’s crumbly nucleus it wasn’t just space exploration, it was time travel...

November 13, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

`Proto-Ichthyosaur' Sheds Light on Fish-Lizard Beginnings

Regular readers will know that I have a major interest in ichthyosaurs, the so-called fish-lizards of the Mesozoic (see links below). As you'll know if you keep your finger on the pulse of Mesozoic reptile news, last week saw the publication of a really interesting new animal from the Lower Triassic: the Chinese `proto-ichthyosaur' Cartorhynchus [...]..

November 12, 2014 — Darren Naish

Medieval Witch Hunts Influenced by Climate Change

August 3, 1562 a devastating thunderstorm hit central Europe, damaging buildings, killing animals and destroying crops and vineyards. The havoc caused by this natural disaster was so great, so unprecedented, that soon an unnatural origin for the storm was proposed...

November 3, 2014 — David Bressan
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Scientific American Health & Medicine

Scientific American Health & Medicine