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A Stunning and Groundbreaking Human Heart Simulation

A Stunning and Groundbreaking Human Heart Simulation

At the cutting edge of research in the life sciences, a team of scientists and animators from Japan has created an astonishing new film about the function of the human heart.

November 13, 2014 — Carin Bondar

Critically Endangered Gecko Discovered in Madagascar

The island of Madagascar is home to a pretty amazing and diverse collection of geckos, with nearly 70 species from 10 different genera. Now you can add one more species to the list: Paroedura hordiesi, a highly camouflaged nocturnal gecko that was recently discovered in northern Madagascar...

November 13, 2014 — John R. Platt

That Comet? That's You, 4.5 Billion Years Ago

As the European Space Agency’s Philae lander bounced and settled onto the surface of comet 67P/C-G’s crumbly nucleus it wasn’t just space exploration, it was time travel...

November 13, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

`Proto-Ichthyosaur' Sheds Light on Fish-Lizard Beginnings

Regular readers will know that I have a major interest in ichthyosaurs, the so-called fish-lizards of the Mesozoic (see links below). As you'll know if you keep your finger on the pulse of Mesozoic reptile news, last week saw the publication of a really interesting new animal from the Lower Triassic: the Chinese `proto-ichthyosaur' Cartorhynchus [...]..

November 12, 2014 — Darren Naish

How Zooplankton Bust a Move

Though plankton drift with the ocean currents, that doesn’t mean they’re incapable of any movement. Many of them can move to find food or mates, and they do so in some surprising and sometimes entertaining ways...

November 12, 2014 — Jennifer Frazer

Sebastian Junger's New Film "The Last Patrol" Glorifies War

“To honor a fallen peer and adjust to life outside the war zones, four men linked by combat journey by foot from Washington, D.C., to Pennsylvania.” That is how HBO describes Sebastian Junger’s new documentary, The Last Patrol, which HBO is airing Monday night...

November 7, 2014 — John Horgan
Mistaken Octopus Sex Identity Leads to Multi-Armed Wrestling Match [Video]

Mistaken Octopus Sex Identity Leads to Multi-Armed Wrestling Match [Video]

The octopus, by in large, practices very safe sex. You would, too, if you and the object of your affection were both cannibals. But the algae octopus (Abdopus aculeatus) has developed a relatively sophisticated mating system that involves far more close contact than many other octopus species...

November 7, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Canine Distemper Could Wipe Out Siberian Tigers

In 2001 a few tigers in Russia started to show signs of obvious distress. Endangered Amur (or Siberian) tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) were underweight, weak, disoriented and incapable of hunting as a result...

November 6, 2014 — John R. Platt

Rarest Kiwi Species Gets Breeding Boost

Fifty birds flew home last month. Now, 50 may not seem like much and flight might not sound all that unusual for birds, but we’re talking about the critically endangered rowi (Apteryx rowi), New Zealand’s scarcest kiwi species and one of the world’s rarest flightless birds...

November 5, 2014 — John R. Platt

Medieval Witch Hunts Influenced by Climate Change

August 3, 1562 a devastating thunderstorm hit central Europe, damaging buildings, killing animals and destroying crops and vineyards. The havoc caused by this natural disaster was so great, so unprecedented, that soon an unnatural origin for the storm was proposed...

November 3, 2014 — David Bressan
The (Zombie-)Toad-in-the-Hole

The (Zombie-)Toad-in-the-Hole

May 8, 1733 two workers, Anders Halfwarder and Olof Sigräfwer, reported excited to superintendent Johan Gråberg, who was inspecting the quarry of Nybro near the village of Wamlingebo (Gotland, Sweden), a very strange discovery...

October 31, 2014 — David Bressan
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