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Best of the Blogs for October: A Bacon Fueled Brain

Best of the Blogs for October: A Bacon Fueled Brain

Check out the latest ‘Best-of-the-blogs’ video from the Scientific American Blog network! We’re talking a fat-fueled brain, the benefits of watching scary television, and the unbelievable longevity of bacterial life...

December 2, 2013 — Carin Bondar
Why Life Does Not Really Exist

Why Life Does Not Really Exist

I have been fascinated with living things since childhood. Growing up in northern California, I spent a lot of time playing outdoors among plants and animals.

December 2, 2013 — Ferris Jabr
On making mistakes

On making mistakes

In the latest issue of the New York Review of Books, Freeman Dyson has a nice review of Mario Livio’s readable book on scientific blunders committed by great scientists.

February 20, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Eat Small: Why our Big Fish Problem is leading to big fish problems

Eat Small: Why our Big Fish Problem is leading to big fish problems

The following is an excerpt from Patrick Mustain’s post on the Food Matters blog: We like big fish. And thats a problem, according to Andy Sharpless, CEO of the ocean conservation organization Oceana, and co-author (along with Suzannah Evans) of the book The Perfect Protein...

February 13, 2014 — Carin Bondar
Obscure and attractive monitor lizards to know and love

Obscure and attractive monitor lizards to know and love

Everybody loves monitor lizards, or varanids. And there is so much to learn about, and to appreciate, in these remarkable, charismatic, complex, sophisticated lizards that scientists across many disciplines are being encouraged to study them and lo to make remarkable discoveries...

February 12, 2014 — Darren Naish
Up Close and Personal With a Humpback Whale

Up Close and Personal With a Humpback Whale

Wow. I’m not sure what impressed me more – the humpback vocalizations or the fact that this ‘Crazy Cameraman’ must have nerves of steel.

February 10, 2014 — Carin Bondar
The pain of not getting cited: oversight, laziness, or malice?

The pain of not getting cited: oversight, laziness, or malice?

Its time to republish this classic article from Tet Zoo ver 2 (originally published in September 2009). The problem Im concerned with certainly hasnt gone away, and in fact is on my mind right now since Ive seen a couple of recent, egregious examples...

February 10, 2014 — Darren Naish
The Turtle with Human Eyes

The Turtle with Human Eyes

At first glance, most eyes look the same. There’s a small opening through which light passes. That light goes through the transparent liquid behind the lens and strikes the retina, a thin film of light-sensitive nerve cells that line the back of the eye...

March 19, 2014 — Jason G. Goldman
Controversies from the world of ratite and tinamou evolution (part I)

Controversies from the world of ratite and tinamou evolution (part I)

As blasphemous and offensive as it seems to say it, birds are pretty samey. Generally speaking, they're small flying things with long forelimbs, proportionally large heads with big, globular braincases, and grasping feet where an enlarged first toe (the hallux) opposes the remaining three...

March 18, 2014 — Darren Naish

This Is What We Don’t Know About The Universe

In recent days I’ve had some interesting conversations. There’s a giddiness going around, related to an outpouring of science love – the kind you get from President Obama introducing TV science shows, the kind that has wonderful visuals, but is, well, a wee bit simplistic (a sin that none of us could ever, ever be [...]..

March 12, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Sunday Species Snapshot: Alaotran Gentle Lemur

Sunday Species Snapshot: Alaotran Gentle Lemur

A primate that lives only in wetlands? That alone makes the Alaotran gentle lemur unique. But this tiny lemur lives in incredibly limited constrained habitat, which continues to shrink around it...

December 22, 2013 — John R. Platt
Octopus, How Do You Count Your Suckers?

Octopus, How Do You Count Your Suckers?

We all know that the male octopus uses his third right arm as a penis. (Oh, you didn’t? It’s true. Sometimes he even detaches it to give to the female.) In fact, all of the arms, if not so specialized, are easily identifiableas numbers one, two, three or four on the left or right side...

December 22, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage
The SOS response: how bacteria deal with damaged DNA

The SOS response: how bacteria deal with damaged DNA

DNA is important stuff. It’s present in all living organisms on the planet (or ‘almost all’ if you wish to remain friends with virologists) and contains the information required to produce and organise the proteins within a cell...

December 22, 2013 — S.E. Gould
A Squamotastic Christmas at Tet Zoo

A Squamotastic Christmas at Tet Zoo

My plan was to get something else finished for Tet Zoo before Christmas but, alas, that just wasn’t possible. So here’s this… And for those of you who want to see more detail, here are enlarged versions… And for all of you Squamozoic fans who need a labelled version… For more on the Squamozoic go [...]..

December 21, 2013 — Darren Naish
Candid Camera (Trap): The Worlds Rarest Big Cat

Candid Camera (Trap): The Worlds Rarest Big Cat

“The Amur or Far Eastern leopard, Panthera pardus orientalis, is the worlds most endangered big cat, and the only one known to be adapted to the cold, snowy environment in which it lives...

December 18, 2013 — Carin Bondar
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End of Summer Sale

End of Summer Sale