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"philosophy of science"

Sociologist Steve Fuller: Scientists Aren’t More Rational Than the Rest of Us

Sociologist Steve Fuller: Scientists Aren’t More Rational Than the Rest of Us

In a column last week, I argued that journalists and other non-scientists have the right and even in some cases the responsibility to question the authority of scientific experts; after all, “even the most accomplished scientists at the most prestigious institutions often make claims that turn out to be erroneous or exaggerated.” My post criticized [...]..

March 23, 2015 — John Horgan
What Is “Ironic Science”?

What Is “Ironic Science”?

I was scanning my Twitter feed recently, pretending to look for “news” while really searching, as usual, for items that praise, condemn or merely allude to me—I mean, let’s face it, all of us social-media addicts are narcissists–when the bells in my amygdala started clanging...

January 16, 2015 — John Horgan
The structure of DNA, 61 years later: How they did it.

The structure of DNA 61 years later: How they did it.

  This month marks the sixty-first anniversary of the publication of the landmark paper on the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick, which appeared in the April 25, 1953 issue of the journal Nature...

April 29, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

It’s the End of Fundamental Physics... Again

Fellow Scientific American blogger John Horgan is at it again. This time he is heralding the end of fundamental physics based on the increasing time lag between Nobel Prizes awarded for fundamental discoveries...

April 16, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Pub-Style Science: exclusion, inclusion, and methodological disputes.

Pub-Style Science: exclusion, inclusion, and methodological disputes.

This is the second part of my transcript of the Pub-Style Science discussion about how (if at all) philosophy can (or should) inform scientific knowledge-building, wherein we discuss methodological disputes, who gets included or excluded in scientific knowledge-building, and ways the exclusion or inclusion might matter...

April 16, 2014 — Janet D. Stemwedel
Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

On my computer screen right now are two molecules. They are both large rings with about thirty atoms each, a motley mix of carbons, hydrogens, oxygens and nitrogens.

April 15, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

What is philosophy of science (and should scientists care)?

Just about 20 years ago, I abandoned a career as a physical chemist to become a philosopher science. For most of those 20 years, people (especially scientists) have been asking me what the heck the philosophy of science is, and whether scientists have any need of it...

April 7, 2014 — Janet D. Stemwedel
Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

This is a guest post by my friend Pinkesh Patel, a data scientist at Facebook. Pinkesh has a PhD in physics from Caltech during which he worked on LIGO, the gravitational wave detector.

April 3, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Brief thoughts on uncertainty.

Brief thoughts on uncertainty.

For context, these thoughts follow upon a very good session at ScienceOnline Together 2014 on “How to communicate uncertainty with the brevity that online communication requires.&..

March 30, 2014 — Janet D. Stemwedel
On making mistakes

On making mistakes

In the latest issue of the New York Review of Books, Freeman Dyson has a nice review of Mario Livio’s readable book on scientific blunders committed by great scientists.

February 20, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Falsification and chemistry: What’s the rub?

A few people seem unhappy with my previous post in which I made the contention that falsification as a philosophy is much less relevant to chemistry than to physics, especially when chemists make molecules...

January 27, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Falsification and its discontents

Falsification and its discontents

One of the answers to Edge.org’s question “What scientific idea is ready for retirement”? is by physicist Sean Carroll. Carroll takes on an idea from the philosophy of science that’s usually considered a given: falsification...

January 24, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Physics and fundamental laws: Necessary truth or misleading cacophony?

Physics and fundamental laws: Necessary truth or misleading cacophony?

Robert Oppenheimer’s greatest contribution to physics was one that he wanted nothing to do with for the rest of his life. In 1939 Oppenheimer and his student Hartland Snyder published a paper in the same issue of the Physical Review that featured Niels Bohr and John Wheeler’s seminal article on the mechanism of nuclear fission [...]..

January 22, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
“What scientific idea is ready for retirement?”

“What scientific idea is ready for retirement?”

Every year since 1998, Big Questions guru John Brockman has posed one big question on Edge.org and gotten about forty or fifty of the world’s leading thinkers to come up with their own answers...

January 15, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
The Fundamental Physics prize continues to be bad for physics.

The Fundamental Physics prize continues to be bad for physics.

The Fundamental Physics prize has again been awarded to sophisticated mathematical speculation disconnected from experimental evidence. The 2012 Fundamental Physics prize was shared among nine physicists, most of who were string theorists. String theorists continue to dominate the awardees of this year’s New Horizons and Frontiers in Physics prizes...

November 18, 2013 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
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