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"physics"

Sneeze Physics Caught in Video

One lab is using slow motion footage of people sneezing to study the physics of these disease-spreading expulsions. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on May 31, 2016...

June 1, 2016 — Nature Video

Ultrasonic Levitation

Nature Video finds out how to levitate objects using sound waves. Scientists can float objects in mid-air, using just the power of sound. Now, using ultrasonic speakers, they can levitate things with more control than ever before, moving small objects in three dimensions even with the whole array turned upside down...

November 6, 2015 — Nature Video
Physics Week in Review: May 9, 2015

Physics Week in Review: May 9, 2015

It’s back, baby! The Large Hadron Collider sees its first low-energy collisions after restarting. A government laboratory found a way to listen to recordings on fragile wax cylinders inside dolls made by Thomas Edison in 1890...

May 9, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: May 2, 2015

Physics Week in Review: May 2, 2015

This week, Quanta featured a three-part series on spacetime. Part 1 is by K.C. Cole: Wormholes Untangle a Black Hole Paradox. A bold new idea aims to link two famously discordant descriptions of nature...

May 2, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: April 25, 2015

Physics Week in Review: April 25, 2015

Here’s a treat for fans of movies and the brain: an article called Strange Continuity. Throughout evolutionary history, we never saw anything like a montage.

April 25, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: April 18, 2015

Physics Week in Review: April 18, 2015

In honor of Tax Day in the US, here is a piece on the IRS’s Favorite Mathematical Law: Armed with Benford’s law, “the IRS can sniff out falsified returns just by looking at the first digit of numbers on taxpayers' forms.” So, beware...

April 18, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette

Neutron Stars Serve Up Plates of Nuclear Pasta

Along with black holes, neutron stars are the result of stars collapsing under gravity once their fuel burns out, until their density is about the same as that of the nucleus of an atom, at which point the protons and electrons “melt” into pure neutrons...

April 14, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette
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