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Botanical Sexism Cultivates Home-Grown Allergies

Botanical Sexism Cultivates Home-Grown Allergies

It's the time year for watery eyes and itchy noses, and if you're among the afflicted, you may be surprised to learn that decades of botanical sexism in urban landscapes have contributed to your woes.

April 29, 2015 — Thomas Leo Ogren

What about Earth’s Microbiome?

The latest temperature readings from Antarctica are giving the world pause, along with the finding that 70 percent of the western Antarctic ice shelf has melted.

April 22, 2015 — Raina Maier

Darwin: the Movie

It’s true, Mr. and Ms. Hollywood Producer, Nash, Hawking, Turing were great and all, and their stories brought big bucks and a few Oscars rolling your way, but come on!

April 12, 2015 — Lawrence Rifkin

Ferns Get It On After 60 Million Years Apart

An unassuming little fern has left scientists scratching their heads at the feat of reproductive hijinks it apparently represents. The fern, xCystocarpium roskamianum(the prefix ‘x’ indicates it is a hybrid), collected in the French Pyrenees, appeared to be a blend of two ferns they know well.

March 27, 2015 — Jennifer Frazer
Birdwatchers, Hunters Train Their Scopes on Conservation

Birdwatchers, Hunters Train Their Scopes on Conservation

Sparked by Richard Louv's book on Nature-Deficit Disorder, many organizations, agencies, teachers and the White House have made the push to get people outside for the benefit of their mental and physical health.

March 9, 2015 — Caren Cooper

For These Plants, No Victim Is Too Small

The tropical plant Genlisea is a tiny, homely rosette of simple green leaves. If you dig up its roots, you will find what look like an unremarkable bunch long, pale underground roots.

February 6, 2015 — Jennifer Frazer
The Lawson Trek: Paddling the Intracoastal Waterway

The Lawson Trek: Paddling the Intracoastal Waterway

We stopped for lunch during the first day of the Lawson Trek on an oyster shoal, an uncharacteristically hot October sun stinging my shoulders, but surprisingly unbothered by four hours of kayak paddling.

December 4, 2014 — Scott Huler
The Lawson Trek: Finding Something New

The Lawson Trek: Finding Something New

Editor's note: For The Lawson Trek, journalist Scott Huler is retracing the journey of discovery undertaken by canoe and on foot in 1700-1701 by John Lawson, the first observer to carefully describe and catalogue the flora, fauna, geography and inhabitants of the Carolinas.

October 10, 2014 — Scott Huler
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