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"pollution"

Axolotls: Saving a Strange Salamander

Axolotls are used to study cancer development and organ regeneration, but their numbers in the wild are dwindling. Conserving wild salamanders could be vital for research—and the future of this special species. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on November 24, 2017. It is a Nature Video production.

November 29, 2017 — Nature Video
What's in Your Air? [Interactive]

What's in Your Air? [Interactive]

Take a deep breath. Hold it. Now, release. Breathing is an amazing bodily function, one that is fundamental to life and an act that we do both automatically and conscientiously.

May 6, 2015 — Angel Hsu & Alisa Zomer

What about Earth’s Microbiome?

The latest temperature readings from Antarctica are giving the world pause, along with the finding that 70 percent of the western Antarctic ice shelf has melted.

April 22, 2015 — Raina Maier

Science and Art Exhibits To Launch 2015

The number of exhibits combining science and art in some capacity has grown steadily since I began blogging about them in 2011. With exhibits in galleries and museums across the country, there’s something for everyone.

January 12, 2015 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Google Maps Dives Underwater with `Street View'

Google has taken its ‘street view’ maps to a whole new level—namely, the ocean's depths. Already, scientists have collected 400,000 panoramic photos of coral reefs and other marine marvels off the coast of Australia and in the Caribbean, some of which viewers can access on Google Maps.

August 13, 2014 — Annie Sneed
The Water Intake Crib: A Primer

The Water Intake Crib: A Primer

So Toledo and environs goes through a terrible water crisis when nutrient-rich water from farms, lawns, and other nonpoint sources flows into Lake Erie.

August 5, 2014 — Scott Huler

Japan Could Lose 561 Plant Species by the Next Century

A massive new study of Japan’s native plants reveals an extinction crisis in the making. The study examined 1,618 threatened Japanese vascular plant species, most of which can be only be found in extremely limited ranges and many of which already face shrinking populations.

June 26, 2014 — John R. Platt

The Quest: 6 Facts about Aging and Aging Research

Fact #1: With about $2.5 billion in annual funding, aging research is in the top 20 research categories supported by the National Institutes of Health.* That gives me another opportunity to test my contention that taking a couple of seconds to think about where to start searching for medical information instead of automatically calling up [...]

May 21, 2014 — Christine Gorman

World’s Deadliest Fuel Made Safe and Clean?

Coal kills. When it’s not horrific mining accidents like the one in Soma, Turkey, on May 13 that killed more than 300 miners, it’s the 13,000 Americans who die early each year because of air pollution from burning the dirtiest fossil fuel.

May 20, 2014 — David Biello

Oil Pollution is Making Gulf Dolphins Sick

For eighty-seven days in 2010, 210 million gallons of oil from wells below the Deepwater Horizon poured into the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers announced recently that as a result, Bottlenose dolphins in Louisiana’s Barataria Bay are suffering from a host of maladies, including lung disease and adrenal problems.

March 4, 2014 — Jason G. Goldman
"pollution"

Complex Causes. Alternative Solutions.