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Lobsters, and the Memory Palace

Lobsters, and the Memory Palace

I listen to a lot of podcasts – on my commute, while sitting at the bench pipetting, doing dishes, in line at the grocery store, wherever.

January 31, 2014 — Kevin Bonham
Nerds and Words: Week 2

Nerds and Words: Week 2

I have dug through the Internet this week and uncovered all this geeky goodness. You can find the thousands of links from previous weeks here.

January 12, 2014 — Kyle Hill
Cosmic Solitude, Exoplanets, and Books

Cosmic Solitude, Exoplanets, and Books

Earlier this week I had the very great pleasure of catching up with Lee Billings, the author of Five Billion Years of Solitude, a beautifully written and provocative new book about the quest to find other Earths, other life in the universe...

January 10, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Nerds and Words: Week 1

Nerds and Words: Week 1

I have dug through the Internet this week and uncovered all this geeky goodness. You can find the thousands of links from previous weeks here.

January 5, 2014 — Kyle Hill
Teaching Kids to Love Science, and Falling in Love with the Kids

Teaching Kids to Love Science, and Falling in Love with the Kids

Put a science writer in a classroom with two-dozen ten-year-olds and I promise you this: the writer will learn more than the kids. I’ve just had that experience, not for the first time but in an especially fulfilling away, while talking about science to a group of fourth and fifth graders at Public School 96 [...]..

December 30, 2013 — Ned Potter
Nerds and Words: Week 52

Nerds and Words: Week 52

But Not Simpler has had a great first year (over 1,000,000 hits in eight months!), of course thanks to all my nerdy readers. I did a lot of experimenting here, from controversial pieces about water fluoridation to a piece on taste perception in full Seussian rhyming scheme to a piece proving that a Pacific Rim [...]..

December 29, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Why Rudolph Should Have Never Joined Santa's Reindeer

Why Rudolph Should Have Never Joined Santas Reindeer

Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose, and if you ever saw it, you would even say it glows. Late one foggy Christmas Eve, Santa came to say, "Rudolph, with your nose so bright, won't you guide my sleigh tonight?" Rudolph declined, noting that when flying around in foggy conditions, a bright red [...]..

December 23, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Octopus, How Do You Count Your Suckers?

Octopus, How Do You Count Your Suckers?

We all know that the male octopus uses his third right arm as a penis. (Oh, you didn’t? It’s true. Sometimes he even detaches it to give to the female.) In fact, all of the arms, if not so specialized, are easily identifiableas numbers one, two, three or four on the left or right side...

December 22, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage
How Photon Torpedoes Will Mark An End To The Energy Crisis

How Photon Torpedoes Will Mark An End To The Energy Crisis

Photon torpedoes come after utopia, at least in Star Trek. Imagining a universe centuries ahead of our own time and technology, the long-running sci-fi shows explored philosophy, morality, and the secluded intricacies of physics...

December 3, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Where are the Women Science Creators on Youtube?

Where are the Women Science Creators on Youtube?

Many times I wondered this myself, and while I had the attention of the youtube infamous Hank Green of SciShow, I asked him in correspondence last year: “One last thing, while I have your attention...

November 27, 2013 — Joanne Manaster
Winners of the Dance Your PhD Competition Revealed

Winners of the Dance Your PhD Competition Revealed

For the past 6 years, Science magazine and its publisher, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, have challenged researchers to explain their doctoral research through interpretive dance...

November 25, 2013 — Julianne Chiaet
Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

Ever since coming to Harvard, I’ve been involved with a graduate student group called “Science in the News.” At SITN, the goal is to bring the fascination with scientists that graduate students have to a wider audience, and the flagship effort of the group is a series of lectures held every Autumn and Spring that [...]..

November 25, 2013 — Kevin Bonham
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