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Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

If there is anything new under the sun it has to be this – and delightfully, it’s the domain of the moon. This spectacular table by Adrien Segal captures tidal data collected from San Francisco Bay for the duration of a full lunar cycle, 29 days in April and May of 2006...

September 18, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Stellar Photography By A Citizen Astronomer

Stellar Photography By A Citizen Astronomer

By now you might be used to spectacular images of celestial bodies thanks to organizations like NASA and the ESA. But it’s still possible to be wowed by these images, especially when they’re taken by people like you and me...

September 15, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Education needs more radioactive spiders. Stay with me. Remember Peter Parker? His childhood wasn’t easy. Both of his parents– Richard and Mary– were killed on a mission as double agents...

September 9, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Your Kitchen Is a Chem Lab and This Is Your Textbook

Your Kitchen Is a Chem Lab and This Is Your Textbook

Maybe you cook, maybe not, but I bet you eat from time to time. If you’re reading articles on Scientific American, I also bet you are at least partially interested in science, and whether you eat gazpacho or goulash, KFC or cronuts, you have to concede this point: cooking is essentially applied chemistry...

September 4, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios
September 15th: A great day out at Arizona insect festival

September 15th: A great day out at Arizona insect festival

I used to have a summer job in Edinburgh’s Butterfly and Insect World. One of the things I would see time and time again would be parents coming in who had already decided that they ‘didn’t like bugs’, and who would influence their children likewise...

September 4, 2013 — Felicity Muth
Introducing: The Food Matters Crew

Introducing: The Food Matters Crew

Do you ever wonder about the science behind your food? We do, too. Our group of writers serves up juicy topics like genetic engineering, gut bacteria and the chemical reactions that occur during cooking...

September 3, 2013 — See Arr Oh
Do Octopuses Feel Pain?

Do Octopuses Feel Pain?

The past couple posts have described some pretty severe experiments on octopuses, including: showing how octopus arms can grow back after inflicted damage and how even severed octopus arms can react to stimuli...

August 30, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage
How Elysium is a Carnival Ride, and Why its Atmosphere is a Bucket of Water

How Elysium is a Carnival Ride, and Why its Atmosphere is a Bucket of Water

Elysium is set over a century in the future, but you can test its physics today. All you need is a carnival ticket and a bucket of water. The latest sci-fi thriller from District 9 director Neill Blomkamp, Elysium tells the story of the haves and the have-nots in the 22nd century (quite literally)...

August 15, 2013 — Kyle Hill
How Elysium is a Carnival Ride, and Why its Atmosphere is a Bucket of Water

How Elysium is a Carnival Ride, and Why its Atmosphere is a Bucket of Water

Elysium is set over a century in the future, but you can test its physics today. All you need is a carnival ticket and a bucket of water. The latest sci-fi thriller from District 9 director Neill Blomkamp, Elysium tells the story of the haves and the have-nots in the 22nd century (quite literally)...

August 15, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Rosalind Franklin vs. Watson & Crick -Clever Kids Rap It Out

Rosalind Franklin vs. Watson & Crick -Clever Kids Rap It Out

Creative science teachers who allow their students to make science history, science stories and science activities their own are, in my opinion, the greatest asset to furthering science knowledge for civilization...

August 8, 2013 — Joanne Manaster
Reweaving the Rainbow: Cicadas, Science, and Creationism

Reweaving the Rainbow: Cicadas, Science, and Creationism

With a swarm of determined zerglings, a Brood War is currently underway on the East coast. Brood II, a cohort of slumbering cicadas, recently made their way out of the ground in the billions to outnumber the humans in their path 600 to 1 (but don’t be surprised if you don’t see any)...

June 13, 2013 — Kyle Hill
How Tardigrades Saved the Enterprise

How Tardigrades Saved the Enterprise

If you trekked into a theater this week to see the latest installment of Star Trek, you saw a damaged starship Enterprise fall out of the sky like a meteor looming over future San Fransisco...

May 31, 2013 — Kyle Hill
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