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Khalil’s Picks (15 November 2013)

Khalil’s Picks (15 November 2013)

Another really awesome week with everything from some some meta-science journalism stories to the wonders of rocks ants, crocodiles, dead satellites and Carl Sagan.

November 15, 2013 — Khalil A. Cassimally
An Asteroid with 6 Tails, and More – The Countdown, Episode 35

An Asteroid with 6 Tails, and More – The Countdown, Episode 35

More to explore: Bizarre Asteroid with Six Tails Spotted by Hubble Telescope (Space.com) Liftoff! India’s First Mars Probe Launches Toward the Red Planet (Space.com) Kepler Telescope Finds Plethora of Earth-Size Planets (Scientific American) Chelyabinsk Eyewitnesses Help Scientists Resolve Meteor Mysteries (Scientific American) Gravity Maps Reveal Why the Moon’s Far Side Is Covered with Craters (Nature [...]..

November 14, 2013 — Joss Fong
NASA’s MAVEN Mission, as told by LeVar Burton

NASA’s MAVEN Mission, as told by LeVar Burton

I am having quite the space-filled weekend! Today, we just had a hangout with astronaut Chris Hadfield and now I’m packing up to head to Cape Canaveral to watch an ATLAS V rocket send the next Mars Orbiter, MAVEN, to space!...

November 14, 2013 — Joanne Manaster
Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

On my computer screen right now are two molecules. They are both large rings with about thirty atoms each, a motley mix of carbons, hydrogens, oxygens and nitrogens.

April 15, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

This is a guest post by my friend Pinkesh Patel, a data scientist at Facebook. Pinkesh has a PhD in physics from Caltech during which he worked on LIGO, the gravitational wave detector.

April 3, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Cool Sh*t I’ve Read Lately

Cool Sh*t I’ve Read Lately

I get tired, now and then, of being such a sourpuss–a Debbie Downer, as my girlfriend calls me, always complaining about something. The wrongness of drone strikes and neuro-weapons research, the downside of psychiatric drugs and tests for cancer, hype about optogenetics and deep brain stimulation and theories of cosmic creation...

March 28, 2014 — John Horgan
The structure of DNA, 61 years later: How they did it.

The structure of DNA, 61 years later: How they did it.

  This month marks the sixty-first anniversary of the publication of the landmark paper on the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick, which appeared in the April 25, 1953 issue of the journal Nature...

April 29, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Astronaut Chris Hadfield's Snapshots from Space [Video]

Today, Chris Hadfield shared in social media a previously released video, Chris Hadfield’s Snapshots from Space! “Throughout his ISS mission, CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield has been taking some of the most incredible photos of Earth ever seen...

April 24, 2014 — Joanne Manaster
Y Combinator and biotech: The wave of the future?

Y Combinator and biotech: The wave of the future?

Y Combinator is the well-known startup incubator that picks promising computer technology startup ideas from a competition every year and seeds them with a few tens of thousands of dollars and dedicated space in Silicon Valley in return for an equity stake...

April 24, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
The Art and Science of Snow

The Art and Science of Snow

This excellent video from USC Dornsife is a fun collaboration between the arts and the sciences. I bet you’ll learn a thing or two that you didn’t know about snowflakes – I certainly did!...

December 13, 2013 — Carin Bondar
Book review: “Nuclear Forces: The Making of the Physicist Hans Bethe” by Silvan Schweber

Book review: “Nuclear Forces: The Making of the Physicist Hans Bethe” by Silvan Schweber

Hans Bethe was one of the greatest and most versatile scientists of the twentieth century. The sheer magnitude of his scientific accomplishments ranging across almost every field of theoretical physics almost defies belief; he was probably the last “universalist”, a man who could solve virtually any physics problem that came his way...

December 2, 2013 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Physics and fundamental laws: Necessary truth or misleading cacophony?

Physics and fundamental laws: Necessary truth or misleading cacophony?

Robert Oppenheimer’s greatest contribution to physics was one that he wanted nothing to do with for the rest of his life. In 1939 Oppenheimer and his student Hartland Snyder published a paper in the same issue of the Physical Review that featured Niels Bohr and John Wheeler’s seminal article on the mechanism of nuclear fission [...]..

January 22, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
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Scientific American Health & Medicine

Scientific American Health & Medicine