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Are Scientists on the Cusp of Knowing How Weird We Are?

I’m writing this post for two reasons. One is to recommend a new book by Columbia astrobiologist Caleb Scharf (who also writes a terrific Scientific American blog, “Life, Unbounded“), and the other is to defend an old book of mine...

November 21, 2014 — John Horgan

Watch the Milky Way Eat Its Neighbors [Video]

The Milky Way has a history of devouring its neighbors, the smaller satellite galaxies that orbit it. Over time our galaxy’s gravity will tug on the near sides of these satellites more strongly than their far sides, slowly stretching them out until they tear apart and their stars assimilate into the Milky Way...

November 18, 2014 — Clara Moskowitz
Generation Open: Sneak Peek Into Science’s Future at OpenCon 2014

Generation Open: Sneak Peek Into Science’s Future at OpenCon 2014

“What is your generation going to do? You don’t have a choice. You will make a mark. Will it be the mark of apathy? Or will you make the internet what it could be?” Michael Carroll is a Professor of Law and one of the founders of the Creative Commons...

November 16, 2014 — Hilda Bastian

Neutrinos on Ice: How to Build a Balloon

Editor's Note: Welcome to ANITA, the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna! From October to December, Katie Mulrey is traveling with the ANITA collaboration to Antarctica to build and launch ANITA III, a scientific balloon that uses the entire continent of Antarctica for neutrino and cosmic ray detection...

November 15, 2014 — Katie Mulrey
Earth’s Age and the Cosmic Calendar

Earth’s Age and the Cosmic Calendar

During  the 19th century geologists realized that earth was quite older than previously believed, however this discovery posed an even greater question: what about the universe?  Did earth (like some fundamental creationists believed and still believe) predate the cosmos, were  earth and the cosmos created at the same time or came earth later?...

November 13, 2014 — David Bressan

That Comet? That's You, 4.5 Billion Years Ago

As the European Space Agency’s Philae lander bounced and settled onto the surface of comet 67P/C-G’s crumbly nucleus it wasn’t just space exploration, it was time travel...

November 13, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

What "Interstellar" Gets Wrong about Interstellar Travel

Christopher Nolan’s new film, Interstellar, is a near-future tale of astronauts departing a dying Earth to travel to Saturn, then through a wormhole to another galaxy, all in search of somewhere else humanity could call home...

November 12, 2014 — Lee Billings

La surrealista tarea de aterrizar en un cometa

El 12 de noviembre del 2014, la misión Rosetta de la Agencia Espacial Europea expulsará el pequeño robot explorador Philae en una trayectoria que deberá llevarlo a la superficie del cometa 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko (o 67P / CP)...

November 5, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Neutrinos On Ice: The Journey South

Neutrinos On Ice: The Journey South

Editor's Note: Welcome to ANITA, the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna! From October to December, Katie Mulrey is traveling with the ANITA collaboration to Antarctica to build and launch ANITA III, a scientific balloon that uses the entire continent of Antarctica for neutrino and cosmic ray detection...

November 5, 2014 — Katie Mulrey

Science in a Republican Senate: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

The Republican Party is widely predicted to win control of the Senate as a result of today's midterm elections. In broadstrokes, that outcome portends a green light for the Keystone XL Pipeline, a blow to the Affordable Care Act and a push for corporate tax reform...

November 4, 2014 — Joshua A. Krisch

The Surreal Task of Landing on a Comet

On November 12th 2014 the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission will eject the small robotic lander Philae on a trajectory that should take it down to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (or 67P/C-P for short)...

November 4, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Painting Across Astronomical Units

Painting Across Astronomical Units

What we find in space continues to challenge our imaginations, and we haven’t even discovered extraterrestrial life yet. Last week,  in Caleb Scharf’s post Astrobiology Roundup: Planets, Moons, and Stinky Comets, he featured the bizarre visualization above...

November 4, 2014 — Glendon Mellow

Future of 3D Printing Lies in Custom Orders

Even as 3-D printing's impact on science, healthcare and consumer electronics grows, these devices aren't likely to find their way into your home anytime soon.

November 3, 2014 — Larry Greenemeier
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