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Scientific American Online Now Speaks Spanish

Scientific American Online Now Speaks Spanish

In 1845, when Scientific American was founded, the name was aspirational for a young country in the midst of the Industrial Revolution. Before the 1800s were out, however, it launched an edition in Spanish...

October 15, 2014 — THE EDITORS
Should we put our money where our citations are?

Should we put our money where our citations are?

A while back I covered a study called "From funding agencies to scientific agency," by researchers from Indiana University's Department of Information and Library Science (Bollen, Crandall, Junk, Ding & Börner, 2014) which suggested an alternative for today's method of allocating research funds using peer review...

October 14, 2014 — Hadas Shema

Aerial Spying, 100 Years before Drones

Reported in Scientific American This Week in World War I: October 10, 1914 Drones are at the forefront of warfare in the 21st century. These unarmed and unpiloted aircraft, big and small, circle far above the battlefield, collecting images and reporting back to headquarters, electronically...

October 10, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
New Walter Isaacson Book: The Innovators

New Walter Isaacson Book: The Innovators

This week, the new Walter Isaacson book, The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution has been released.

October 9, 2014 — Joanne Manaster
MIT Neurotech: Microfluidics Opens a Window Into Unseen Worlds

MIT Neurotech: Microfluidics Opens a Window Into Unseen Worlds

A 14-foot aluminum alloy robot hurdles through the black of space at 13,000 miles per hour. For 350 million miles, its load of scientific instruments built t0 detect X-rays and analyze minerals sits isolated, periodically pinging the craft's home planet...

October 9, 2014 — Amy Robinson

Scientific American Science in Action Winner Kenneth Shinozuka

It’s no secret to Scientific American readers that we feel a special obligation to support the next generation of science enthusiasts, whom we hope to inspire both with our science coverage and our education initiatives, including the Scientific American Science in Action Award, powered by the Google Science Fair...

October 9, 2014 — Mariette DiChristina

Submarine Exosuit Makes Its First Manned Ocean Dive

Editor's Note: Veteran science journalist Philip Hilts is working with a team of archeologists, engineers and divers off the shore of Antikythera, a remote Greek island, where a treasure ship by the same name sank in 70 B.C...

October 8, 2014 — Philip J. Hilts
The Practical Blue LED

The Practical Blue LED

As you may have heard, the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2014 is awarded to a trio of Japanese scientists. Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources." There are, of course, [...]..

October 7, 2014 — Joanne Manaster
DIY Culture Empowers the Next Generation of Latinas in STEM

DIY Culture Empowers the Next Generation of Latinas in STEM

Editor's note: During National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15), Ciencia Puerto Rico and Borinqueña are celebrating the work of organizations inspiring, supporting and empowering Latinas in STEM fields...

October 6, 2014 — Mónica I. Feliú-Mójer
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