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5 Instagram Tips for Science Artists

I’ve been on Instagram for a long time, with a private account to share family photos with friends. Last year, I decided to start up a second account, @FlyingTrilobite, to share my art in process, and the sort of things I normally share on my blog...

April 29, 2015 — Glendon Mellow
Can a Hole in Your Head Get You High?

Can a Hole in Your Head Get You High?

Of the weird conversations I’ve had in my life, many of the weirdest took place while I was researching my 2003 book Rational Mysticism, which explores religious experiences and other exotic states of consciousness...

April 27, 2015 — John Horgan
Japan Now Has More EV Chargers Than Gas Stations

Japan Now Has More EV Chargers Than Gas Stations

For any alternative fuel in transport, the key question is: what about infrastructure? As in, how much does infrastructure cost, what are the environmental effects, and who is actually going to pay for it?...

April 26, 2015 — Tali Trigg
NASA Goes Big and Bold for Exoplanet Science

NASA Goes Big and Bold for Exoplanet Science

                  A United States federal agency is not necessarily the first place you think of when it comes to answering some of the deepest existential questions for our species...

April 24, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf
Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Scientific American looked at the wider context of the battle for Gallipoli. This Week in World War I: April 24, 1915 April 25, 2015, marks the 100-year anniversary of an important battle in the First World War: it was a major defeat for the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) and a great victory for the [...]..

April 24, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Hubble's Repairman Reflects on the Telescope's Legacy

Twenty-five years ago, on April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope soared into orbit. Since then, its great discoveries have been legion, and the story of how it became the most successful and productive astronomical observatory in human history is destined to become legendary...

April 24, 2015 — Lee Billings
Along the Tiger's Trail: Genetic Studies Aid Conservation

Along the Tiger's Trail: Genetic Studies Aid Conservation

Editor's Note: "Along the Tiger's Trail" is a  series about the efforts to monitor tigers and their prey in the Malenad landscape in southwestern India that harbors one of the world's largest population of wild tigers...

April 23, 2015 — Vishnupriya S. and Dr. Samba Kumar

Can the U.S. Go All-Electric?

New homes wired with the latest smart gadgets cluster together around shared park spaces. Blue-black panels that transform sunshine into electricity grace a majority of roofs.

April 22, 2015 — David Biello

Heavy Guns Blast Trenches, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 17, 1915. High technology blasted a way through fortified lines in the First World War.

April 17, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Putting A New Spin on Space Elevators

Fans of sci-fi author Arthur C. Clarke know and love his 1979 classic novel, The Fountains of Paradise. The plot centers on efforts of a visionary structural engineer in the 22nd century, Dr Vannevar Morgan, to construct a space elevator connecting the surface of the earth with a satellite in geostationary orbit, almost a kind [...]..

April 15, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette

Indian Railways and Military Go Solar

There's been no shortage recently of big companies going big on solar, nor of middlemen trying to pave the way for bulk buying of solar power, but when the beast that is national procurement gets involved, the ante is upped...

April 15, 2015 — Tali Trigg

Where Would you Leave a Message From the Stars?

A recent article by Samuel Arbesman in the science magazine Nautilus discusses the extraordinary sounding possibility that – just perhaps – a search for extraterrestrial intelligence could be made by looking at our DNA...

April 14, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

ScienceDebate Revs Up for 2016 Presidential Election

This year, I've been very fortunate to be a part of the inaugural class of the Presidential Leadership Scholars (PLS) program, which brings together 60 leaders from around the country to work on projects designed to create significant social impact and change...

April 13, 2015 — Sheril Kirshenbaum
Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

As a middle school student in Tallahassee, Florida, Kelly Caylor built a weather balloon for the science fair. Decades later, he's distributing high-tech environmental sensors, or "pods," throughout sub-Saharan Africa...

April 10, 2015 — Kerry Klein
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