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Rescuing the Drowning Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 10, 1915 The United States submarine F-4 was launched in January 1912, and foundered in March 1915 near Honolulu in 300 feet of water, with the loss of all 21 crew...

April 10, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Watch the First Artificial Gravity Experiment

Gravity, as the old joke goes, sucks. It drags us down, pulls on our weary limbs, makes our feet tired, makes parts of us droop. But it’s also a critical factor for our long term well-being...

April 6, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Proud Battleships, Subtle Mines: Dardanelles, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 3, 1915 "The day when Constantinople will be covered by the guns of the enemy is not very far distant." That's the ebulliant sentence from the article in Scientific American two weeks before this one, just after the initial British and French attack near [...]..

April 3, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
A Tale of Two City-States

A Tale of Two City-States

How Hong Kong and Singapore Went from Fishing Villages to Urban Lodestars I'm writing this on a flight from Hong Kong where news has just broken that the father of the Singaporean city-state Lee Kuan Yew has passed away...

March 31, 2015 — Tali Trigg

Images of the Massive, March 11 Solar Flare

We live a mere 93 million miles from an enormous fusion reactor. It’s easy to overlook this, after all the Sun is only about halfway through its long slog of converting protons into helium nuclei deep inside its core...

March 31, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf
Along the Tiger's Trail: Counting the Prey

Along the Tiger's Trail: Counting the Prey

Thimmayya, a Jenu Kuruba tribesman who lives in the Nagarahole Tiger Reserve is leading the way. Following him is Killivalavan Rayar, a senior research associate working with WCS India Program...

March 27, 2015 — Varun R. Goswami and N. Samba Kumar
The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 27, 1915 Airships with rigid frames were developed by Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin of Germany starting in the late 19th century...

March 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
When discussing Humanity’s next move to space, the language we use matters.

When discussing Humanity’s next move to space, the language we use matters.

Elon Musk’s vision for the humanity and colonizing Mars makes me incredibly uneasy. It’s not that Elon Musk has said very many inappropriate things, it’s that so much of the dialogue about colonizing Mars – inspired, initiated and often influenced by Musk – uses language and frameworks that are a little problematic (and I’m being [...]..

March 26, 2015 — DNLee

After a Martian Marathon, NASA's Opportunity Rover Faces Uncertain Future

It's been a long time coming, but this week NASA's Mars Opportunity rover completed the first-ever Martian marathon. After landing on the Red Planet in January 2004 on a mission originally planned to only last 90 days, Opportunity has instead endured for more than a decade, and has taken eleven years and two months to [...]..

March 25, 2015 — Lee Billings
Sociologist Steve Fuller: Scientists Aren’t More Rational Than the Rest of Us

Sociologist Steve Fuller: Scientists Aren’t More Rational Than the Rest of Us

In a column last week, I argued that journalists and other non-scientists have the right and even in some cases the responsibility to question the authority of scientific experts; after all, “even the most accomplished scientists at the most prestigious institutions often make claims that turn out to be erroneous or exaggerated.” My post criticized [...]..

March 23, 2015 — John Horgan

The Science of TED 2015

What I love about the annual TED gathering in Vancouver is the way science coexists along with art, social justice, popular song and the rest of TED's eclectic mix.

March 23, 2015 — Fred Guterl
Naval Attack on the Dardanelles: Prelude to a Disaster, 1915

Naval Attack on the Dardanelles: Prelude to a Disaster, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 20, 1915 The report published in this issue from a century ago delivers a robustly optimistic outlook on the Allied attack on Turkish territory at the entrance to the waterway between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean: "If the great Mahan were living to-day [...]..

March 20, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
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