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Has An Exomoon Been Found?

Has An Exomoon Been Found?

Intriguing data from an event in 2007 hints at an exomoon forming around a giant planet in a youthful star system 420 light years from Earth.

January 27, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Extreme Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 16, 1915 Before the First World War, Simon Lake designed and built some innovative submarines for the U.S.

January 16, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Whose time are we celebrating for the New Year?

Whose time are we celebrating for the New Year?

Note: A version of this post appeared on Anthropology in Practice in 2010. It’s New Year’s Eve in the United States, and in New York City tourists and residents are getting ready for the countdown in Times Square that marks the end of the year and the beginning of a new one...

December 31, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
The World’s Biggest Dump Truck is Electric

The World’s Biggest Dump Truck is Electric

For the truck lovers out there – check out the BelAZ 75710 dump truck that is currently at work in a Siberian mine in the Kuzbass region of Russia.

December 26, 2014 — Melissa C. Lott
Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Two billion year-old water pockets and a revised deep hydrogen content are good news for Earth’s vast subsurface biosphere, and could offer clues to life on Mars and much further beyond...

December 18, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

First Airplane Flight Marks 111th Anniversary!

It was 111 years ago today that the world's first piloted, powered, controllable, heavier-than-air machine built and flown by Orville and Wilbur Wright took to the air.

December 17, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Advice to Young Science Writers: Ask “What Would Chomsky Think?”

Advice to Young Science Writers: Ask “What Would Chomsky Think?”

I’ve been pondering my profession again lately, for several reasons: shifts in the Scientific American Blog Network; the launch of a science communication program at my school, Stevens Institute of Technology, which is closely allied with a new program in science, technology and society (STS); and finally a chat with editors at IEEE Spectrum, where [...]..

December 17, 2014 — John Horgan
The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

Reported in Scientific American this week in World War I, November 7, 1914 Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, the man who built up the Imperial Navy of Germany, had dismissed submarines as a waste of money back in 1901...

November 7, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Return to Nepal: Snow Sampling

Return to Nepal: Snow Sampling

Editor's Note: This is the third and final installment in a new series by Ulyana Horodyskyj, who chronicled an earlier expedition to Nepal in a series called, "Climbing Mount Everest," which can be found by clicking here...

November 24, 2014 — Ulyana Horodyskyj

Is AI Dangerous? That Depends…

Somewhere in the long list of topics that are relevant to astrobiology is the question of ‘intelligence’. Is human-like, technological intelligence likely to be common across the universe?...

February 13, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Jupiter’s Moons Ascending

Some natural phenomena need few words to explain why they’re fascinating. Eclipses, transits, and phases in astronomy tend to fall into that category.

February 6, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf
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Scientific American Health & Medicine

Scientific American Health & Medicine