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Re-Live The Tevatron's Demise, or Just Hear Some Fermilab Rap from 1992 [Video]

Re-Live The Tevatron's Demise, or Just Hear Some Fermilab Rap from 1992 [Video]

By now the huge Higgs news out of CERN is no longer news. The apparent discovery of the Higgs boson has been rehashed countless times in the three-plus weeks since physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) outside Geneva announced they had found a new particle with a strong resemblance to the long-sought Higgs...

July 27, 2012 — John Matson

The Neuroscience and Art of Film Scores

If you’re looking around for something to watch this Sunday evening that complements the Oscars, the World Science Festival has a great video which features the Coen Brothers, film composer Carter Burwell, Alec Baldwin, and neuroscientist Aniruddh Patel discussing the emotional effects and role of music in film...

March 2, 2014 — Princess Ojiaku
Japan Now Has More EV Chargers Than Gas Stations

Japan Now Has More EV Chargers Than Gas Stations

For any alternative fuel in transport, the key question is: what about infrastructure? As in, how much does infrastructure cost, what are the environmental effects, and who is actually going to pay for it?...

April 26, 2015 — Tali Trigg
Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Scientific American looked at the wider context of the battle for Gallipoli. This Week in World War I: April 24, 1915 April 25, 2015, marks the 100-year anniversary of an important battle in the First World War: it was a major defeat for the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) and a great victory for the [...]..

April 24, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
NASA Goes Big and Bold for Exoplanet Science

NASA Goes Big and Bold for Exoplanet Science

                  A United States federal agency is not necessarily the first place you think of when it comes to answering some of the deepest existential questions for our species...

April 24, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Putting a New Spin on Space Elevators

Fans of sci-fi author Arthur C. Clarke know and love his 1979 classic novel, The Fountains of Paradise. The plot centers on efforts of a visionary structural engineer in the 22nd century, Dr Vannevar Morgan, to construct a space elevator connecting the surface of the earth with a satellite in geostationary orbit, almost a kind [...]..

April 15, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette
Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

As a middle school student in Tallahassee, Florida, Kelly Caylor built a weather balloon for the science fair. Decades later, he's distributing high-tech environmental sensors, or "pods," throughout sub-Saharan Africa...

April 10, 2015 — Kerry Klein
Along the Tiger's Trail: Counting the Prey

Along the Tiger's Trail: Counting the Prey

Thimmayya, a Jenu Kuruba tribesman who lives in the Nagarahole Tiger Reserve is leading the way. Following him is Killivalavan Rayar, a senior research associate working with WCS India Program...

March 27, 2015 — Varun R. Goswami and N. Samba Kumar
When discussing Humanity’s next move to space, the language we use matters.

When discussing Humanity’s next move to space, the language we use matters.

Elon Musk’s vision for the humanity and colonizing Mars makes me incredibly uneasy. It’s not that Elon Musk has said very many inappropriate things, it’s that so much of the dialogue about colonizing Mars – inspired, initiated and often influenced by Musk – uses language and frameworks that are a little problematic (and I’m being [...]..

March 26, 2015 — DNLee

Is AI Dangerous? That Depends…

Somewhere in the long list of topics that are relevant to astrobiology is the question of ‘intelligence’. Is human-like, technological intelligence likely to be common across the universe?...

February 13, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf
Photo Friday: Looking at Light – The Spectral Goniophotometer

Photo Friday: Looking at Light – The Spectral Goniophotometer

Assistant Development Engineer My Nguyen uses a spectral goniophotometer (a.k.a. a light angle measurement device) at the California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California, Davis. In this photo, Nguyen is using the instrument to measure how light is distributed from a prototype light fixture (luminaire)...

October 11, 2013 — Melissa C. Lott
A Mosaic of September SciArt Glory

A Mosaic of September SciArt Glory

How many times do you have to do something before it is considered tradition? Last year, Glendon had the excellent idea to post a different #sciart image each day in the month of September...

October 1, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Lab Life: The Anatomy of a Retraction

Lab Life: The Anatomy of a Retraction

Scientists travel on the edge of the known world, exploring nature through observation, experimentation and repeated testing. Our building blocks are pieces of experimental evidence that are linked into coherent models of the universe...

October 10, 2013 — Pamela Ronald
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End of Summer Sale

End of Summer Sale