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Khalil’s Picks (25 October 2013)

Khalil’s Picks (25 October 2013)

We’re back in business! This week was pretty phenomenal with Shutdown’s effects on science, evolution, history of sand, Google Flu, the chemist that is nature… Quick note before I leave you with this week’s great reads...

October 25, 2013 — Khalil A. Cassimally
Photo Friday: Daylight harvesting

Photo Friday: Daylight harvesting

In this photo, University of California – Davis graduate student Judy Xu is shown adjusting a lab prototype of a daylight harvesting device developed and tested at the university’s California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC). The self-calibrating photocontrol reduces electric lighting power based on the amount of daylight available through skylights...

October 25, 2013 — Melissa C. Lott
Welcome to Raleigh Video for ASTC

Welcome to Raleigh Video for ASTC

In my day job – a phrase that still doesn’t roll off the tongue, having been a freelancer for two decades – I work at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh...

October 24, 2013 — Brian Malow
Teenager creates new flu drugs

Teenager creates new flu drugs

Last month, 17-year-old Eric Chen from San Diego, California became the third Grand Prize winner in Google Science Fair history. Judges awarded him $50,000, a 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands, a year of mentoring, and other prizes...

October 21, 2013 — Anna Kuchment

Teenager creates new flu drugs

Last month, 17-year-old Eric Chen from San Diego, California became the third Grand Prize winner in Google Science Fair history. Judges awarded him $50,000, a 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands, a year of mentoring, and other prizes...

October 21, 2013 — Anna Kuchment

The Need for Belonging in Math and Science

From her earliest memories, Catherine Good was good at math. By second grade she was performing at the fourth grade level, sometimes even helping the teacher grade other students’ work.

October 21, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman

The Great Martian Storm of ’71

                          On November 14th 1971 NASA’s Mariner 9 became the first spacecraft to successfully orbit another planet...

October 21, 2013 — Caleb A. Scharf
Astronaut versus Cowboy Ethics

Astronaut versus Cowboy Ethics

“Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.” So said Garrett Hardin to correct misreadings of his misnamed “tragedy of the commons.” He’s partly right.

October 11, 2013 — Jag Bhalla
WeatherSignal: Big Data Meets Forecasting

WeatherSignal: Big Data meets Forecasting

Smartphone-collected Big Data has the potential to transform the way we can understand and predict weather systems. Five months ago, we at OpenSignal (a project to map global cell phone signal coverage) launched an app called WeatherSignal to collect atmospheric data from smartphones...

October 11, 2013 — Samuel Johnston
Photo Friday: Looking at Light – The Spectral Goniophotometer

Photo Friday: Looking at Light – The Spectral Goniophotometer

Assistant Development Engineer My Nguyen uses a spectral goniophotometer (a.k.a. a light angle measurement device) at the California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California, Davis. In this photo, Nguyen is using the instrument to measure how light is distributed from a prototype light fixture (luminaire)...

October 11, 2013 — Melissa C. Lott
Lab Life: The Anatomy of a Retraction

Lab Life: The Anatomy of a Retraction

Scientists travel on the edge of the known world, exploring nature through observation, experimentation and repeated testing. Our building blocks are pieces of experimental evidence that are linked into coherent models of the universe...

October 10, 2013 — Pamela Ronald
Colder Than Ice: Researchers Discover How Microbes Survive in Subfreezing Conditions

Colder Than Ice: Researchers Discover How Microbes Survive in Subfreezing Conditions

Most microbial researchers grow their microbes in petri-dishes to study how they grow and how they respond to damaging conditions. But researchers in Louisiana State University’s Department of Biological Sciences are doing something almost unheard of: studying microbes under freezing conditions to understand how organisms could survive for hundreds of thousands of years in deep [...]..

October 10, 2013 — Paige Brown
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