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How many TV sets do you have—and why does it matter?

How many TV sets do you have—and why does it matter?

In the early nineties, researchers predicted that at the current rate of growth, there would be two televisions per US household by 1995. It’s probably safe to say that we have likely exceeded that prediction...

March 16, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa
Magnets of Mercy Treat War Injuries, 1915

Magnets of Mercy Treat War Injuries, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 13, 1915 In a war that was defined by the mass production of war supplies, the great manufacturing center of Pittsburgh, Pa., was already an important source of matériel for all the armies involved: "Pittsburgh's great industrial plants are furnishing practically all the barbed [...]..

March 13, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
How Identity Evolves in the Age of Genetic Imperialism

How Identity Evolves in the Age of Genetic Imperialism

From designer babies to women whose genitals smell like peaches, 2014 graced us with a taste of the hope, hype and superficiality of business as usual in Silicon Valley.

March 13, 2015 — Eleonore Pauwels and Jim Dratwa

The Overly Dramatic Demise of the Light Bulb

Remember when the fight against phasing out inefficient incandescent light bulbs was a big deal? Well it seems the sky didn't fall. Just recently, Canada joined the United States, the European Union, and Australia among several countries (see map below) to phase out the production and import of inefficient incandescent light bulbs...

March 9, 2015 — Tali Trigg
A Blizzard of Astrobiology

A Blizzard of Astrobiology

Astrobiology has one key advantage when it comes to tooting its own horn – it can lay claim to a diverse range of scientific research as being relevant to the study of life in the universe...

March 9, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

What Chappie Says, and Doesn't Say, About Artificial Intelligence

I'm not a scold about scientific accuracy in film. As long as a movie is not built on a fundamentally stupid premise (“Lucy,” the Scarlet Johansson vehicle predicated on the false notion that humans use only 10 percent of their brains, comes to mind), I am happy to let myself be entertained...

March 6, 2015 — Seth Fletcher

The Big Guns, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 6, 1915 World War I was an artillery war. Even as new technology—tanks, airplanes, submarines and poison gas—changed the nature of fighting, it was the power of mass manufacturing that had the most profound effect on the conduct of war...

March 6, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Eiffel Tower Going Green With Two New Wind Turbines

The City of Light’s green makeover touched the iconic Eiffel Tower last week as it ramped up two onsite wind turbines. These turbines are installed inside the tower’s metal scaffolding on the second level, and are painted in the same color to minimize their visual impact on the 126-year-old tower...

March 6, 2015 — Melissa C. Lott

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2015

What innovations are leaping out of the labs to shape the world in powerful ways? Identifying those compelling innovations is the charge of the Meta-Council on Emerging Technologies, one of the World Economic Forum’s network of expert communities that form the Global Agenda Councils, which today released its Top 10 List of Emerging Technologies for [...]..

March 4, 2015 — Mariette DiChristina
Along the Tiger's Trail: Where Are the Cats Found and Why?

Along the Tiger's Trail: Where Are the Cats Found and Why?

A team of four WCS India Program field members are sweating it out in the rugged hilly terrain of Malenad. Walking neither too fast, nor too slow, they follow a trail, diligently observing and recording signs of tigers and other wildlife along the way...

March 3, 2015 — A. Srivathsa, K.K. Karanth and S. Shrestha
Help Us Start a SciArt Tweet Storm

Help Us Start a SciArt Tweet Storm

In addition to being artists ourselves, the Symbiartic team hopes to help advance the presence of images in science communication and culture.

March 1, 2015 — Glendon Mellow
Quick Twitter Tip for Attributing Art

Quick Twitter Tip for Attributing Art

When I see some amazing art posted on Twitter without attribution to the creator, especially by someone in science communication, I kind of lose it.

February 28, 2015 — Glendon Mellow
Building New Homes for Energy Innovation

Building New Homes for Energy Innovation

As discussions begin today at the 10th MIT Energy Conference, the energy sector ponders how industry, government, and the scientific community can combine forces to enable the rapid evolution of the energy system...

February 27, 2015 — Varun Mehra and Sebastien Lounis
American Fear, 1915

American Fear, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: February 27, 1915 The size, speed and ferocity of the Great War was unprecedented.

February 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Can Chinese Cities Turn Around Pollution in Time?

Can Chinese Cities Turn Around Pollution in Time?

China became a mostly urban country in 2011, the service sector became the biggest in 2013, and in 2015 Chinese cities will try to reverse negative trends of sprawl and pollution.

February 26, 2015 — Tali Trigg
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