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If Only Pinterest Would Show Me More Ads… Said No One, EVER.

I want so badly to love Pinterest, but we just don’t seem to be compatible lovers. My initial objection to their service was the cavalier way in which they claimed rights to creative work displayed on their site (almost certainly a relic of being a new startup and writing the broadest terms of service they [...]..

July 31, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Will the Robot Uprising Be Squishy?

Octopuses offer an extreme engineering challenge: They are almost infinitely flexible, entirely soft-bodied and incredibly intelligent. Are we vertebrate humans ever going to be able to build anything as deformable and complex as a real octopus?...

July 26, 2013 — Katherine Harmon
Could the Boston Bomber Have Fled from Infrared?

Could the Boston Bomber Have Fled from Infrared?

Late last Friday a terrible week that began with the bombing of the Boston Marathon came to a satisfying, if somber, conclusion. The last alleged perpetrator of the horrific events at the marathon and MIT was arrested after a most dangerous game of hide and seek...

April 24, 2013 — Kyle Hill
The Physics of Fred Flintstone's Flaming Feet

The Physics of Fred Flintstone's Flaming Feet

I hope that the father of the "modern Stone Age family" has thick skin, or else he is going to lose his legs. Let's put aside the fact that Fred Flintstone basically runs to work and therefore doesn't really need his wheels (or that he would need the quads of a god to get them [...]..

April 22, 2013 — Kyle Hill
What Mushroom Clouds Can Reveal about the Waco Explosion

What Mushroom Clouds Can Reveal about the Waco Explosion

On Wednesday night a fertilizer plant north of Waco, Texas, caught fire and exploded. The violent rupture shook the earth for miles around (the explosion was picked up by seismographs in Oklahoma), set fire to the surroundings, and collapsed nearby buildings...

April 18, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Hold the Elevator: How Otis's Early Systems Worked

Hold the Elevator: How Otis's Early Systems Worked

2013 marks 160 years since Elisha Graves Otis sold his first elevator, designed specifically for safety. Sales languished, though, until he attended the 1854 world's fair in New York City and, at the Crystal Palace, demonstrated the innovation that made elevators stop, instead of falling, if their cables snapped...

April 12, 2013 — Ricki Rusting
The Animals Hiding in a T. Rex's Roar

The Animals Hiding in a T. Rex's Roar

Instead of producing the terror you may suspect, cinema's most famous roar would probably just confuse a lot of animals. If you made it to the recently re-released 3D edition of Jurassic Park, you're going to hear a dreadful sound that terrified audiences two decades ago...

April 10, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Superman Explains Why He Didn't Destroy the Russian Meteor

Superman Explains Why He Didn't Destroy the Russian Meteor

FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE—After more than a month of attempts to contact the reclusive hero, reports are coming in today from the icy home of global do-gooder Superman that he intentionally let the meteor that impacted Chelyabinsk, Russia on February 15th enter the atmosphere and explode...

March 18, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Europa Gives Up Some Of Its Secrets

Europa Gives Up Some Of Its Secrets

Jupiter’s enigmatic moon Europa has long been thought to contain a huge ocean beneath its icy crust, but what is in that ocean and does it ever come to the surface?

March 6, 2013 — Caleb A. Scharf
The Ocarina of Time Travel, Extra Dimensions and Branching Universes

The Ocarina of Time Travel, Extra Dimensions and Branching Universes

One of the most critically acclaimed videogames of all time had a core mechanic that bends everyday physics. Borrowed and adapted to countless tales of science fiction, the time travel in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was fairly novel for a videogame...

March 3, 2013 — Kyle Hill
The God of Thunder, and Momentum

The God of Thunder, and Momentum

Thor—Norse god, Marvel superhero, and Hollywood eye candy—presents those of us living in the real world with a few problems. Thor is a "demigod," and any attempt to scientifically explore his otherworldly abilities can be dismissed as such...

February 7, 2013 — Kyle Hill

2013: A Brain Wave Symphony?

Just about everyone appreciates music, but music that results from a creative implementation of sound can be especially compelling. Human beings are inventive creatures who discover a myriad of ways to innovate in the musical realm...

January 7, 2013 — Princess Ojiaku
This Is Your Brain on the Internet (Maybe)

This Is Your Brain on the Internet (Maybe)

Headlines like "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" or "Is the Internet Making Us Dumber?" quite clearly show that people are concerned about what the Internet is doing to our cognition.

September 11, 2012 — Kyle Hill
Bill Nye Is Not a Businessman

Bill Nye Is Not a Businessman

Bill Nye, the nerdy supernova that fostered my childhood love of science, has recently gone viral in a video highly critical of the teaching of creationism to children.

September 2, 2012 — Kyle Hill
Re-Live The Tevatron's Demise, or Just Hear Some Fermilab Rap from 1992 [Video]

Re-Live The Tevatron's Demise, or Just Hear Some Fermilab Rap from 1992 [Video]

By now the huge Higgs news out of CERN is no longer news. The apparent discovery of the Higgs boson has been rehashed countless times in the three-plus weeks since physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) outside Geneva announced they had found a new particle with a strong resemblance to the long-sought Higgs...

July 27, 2012 — John Matson
A taste of #TEDMED 2012: Main Course

A taste of #TEDMED 2012: Main Course

The initial fare at TEDMED 2012 whet my appetite for the sessions that followed. Howard-Yana Shapiro, a plant scientist wizard, focused on how to improve nutrition in crops, rather than just the volume of the yield, and the coming crisis in feeding the world's population...

April 20, 2012 — Judy Stone
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