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Curved TV and Smartphones: Gimmick or Gadget Godsend?

Moviegoers have long been familiar with the benefits of viewing content on a curved screen. The screen's curvature equalizes the distance that light from the projector must travel, enhancing resolution and brightness while eliminating distortion...

January 8, 2015 — Larry Greenemeier
Neutrinos on Ice: Launching the Balloon

Neutrinos on Ice: Launching the Balloon

Editor's Note: Welcome to ANITA, the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna! From October to December, Katie Mulrey is traveling with the ANITA collaboration to Antarctica to build and launch ANITA III, a scientific balloon that uses the entire continent of Antarctica for neutrino and cosmic ray detection...

January 7, 2015 — Katie Mulrey
Software: The Next Challenge for Grid Batteries

Software: The Next Challenge for Grid Batteries

It seems like every day we hear about another incremental breakthrough in battery technology. By tweaking existing battery chemistries or inventing new chemistries altogether, university researchers and startup companies have managed to increase the energy density, cycle life, energy efficiency, and safety of numerous potential grid battery technologies...

January 6, 2015 — Robert Fares
An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 2, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the second installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: Patrol of the Sky" by Frederick C...

January 2, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Into the Public Domain

Into the Public Domain

In honor of January 1st being Public Domain Day, I am releasing a few of my older images from copyright: These images are now available for all uses, including commercial use, without the need for attribution or permission...

January 1, 2015 — Alex Wild
My Personal Best Photographs of 2014

My Personal Best Photographs of 2014

2014 was a busy year, and an odd one in terms of subject matter. Usually my stream is full of ants. I am trained as an ant biologist, after all, and these charming social insects typically weigh heavily in my photographs (see 2013, 2012, 2011)...

December 31, 2014 — Alex Wild
Whose time are we celebrating for the New Year?

Whose time are we celebrating for the New Year?

Note: A version of this post appeared on Anthropology in Practice in 2010. It’s New Year’s Eve in the United States, and in New York City tourists and residents are getting ready for the countdown in Times Square that marks the end of the year and the beginning of a new one...

December 31, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
As 2014 comes to a close – a few favorites

As 2014 comes to a close – a few favorites

It has been a busy year here at Plugged In. We have said a fond farewell (for now) to David Wogan and were excited to see Scott Huler launch a new project on Scientific American’s Expeditions...

December 31, 2014 — Melissa C. Lott
These agents prevent disease. Why aren't we using them?

These agents prevent disease. Why aren't we using them?

The life cycle of a medical advance usually goes something like this: from discovery at the research bench and replication of findings, to translational research and clinical trials, to implementation...

December 31, 2014 — Ilana Yurkiewicz
Paintings under an iPhone Olloclip

Paintings under an iPhone Olloclip

I can’t help myself. I take a lot of pictures using my macro lenses on my Olloclip for iPhone. Leaves, snow, thistles and teasels, rocks and skin.

December 31, 2014 — Glendon Mellow

Octopus Genome Remains Elusive—But Full of Promise

As many mysteries as the octopus holds—its comprehensive camouflage, smart suckers, agile brain—its genome is surely holding many more (including how it can regenerate its arms—suckers, nerves and all)...

December 30, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage
Will We Find Extraterrestrial Life In 2015?

Will We Find Extraterrestrial Life In 2015?

Probably not, but just possibly yes. One of the reasons that the search for life elsewhere in the universe is so exciting is that it would take only one chance discovery, one lucky break, for all the walls to come tumbling down...

December 29, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
A Photographic Survey of the American Yard

A Photographic Survey of the American Yard

Though it’s tempting to think you must spend thousands of dollars on equipment to take great photographs, Joshua White is helping prove that the best camera is the one you have on you when the inspiration strikes...

December 26, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
The World’s Biggest Dump Truck is Electric

The World’s Biggest Dump Truck is Electric

For the truck lovers out there – check out the BelAZ 75710 dump truck that is currently at work in a Siberian mine in the Kuzbass region of Russia.

December 26, 2014 — Melissa C. Lott
An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 26, 1914 In this issue of Scientific American from 1914, we published the first installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: The Diary of an American Volunteer With the Aviation Corps of the French Army," by Frederick C...

December 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
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The Essential Guide to the Modern World

The Essential Guide to the Modern World