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Neutrinos on Ice: Waiting to Fly

Neutrinos on Ice: Waiting to Fly

It’s another beautiful day in Antarctica, and the time has come to launch ANITA! Finding the right date is tricky. Many factors have to fall into place.

December 19, 2014 — Katie Mulrey
Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Mars, Ancient Water, Deep Hydrogen, and Life

Two billion year-old water pockets and a revised deep hydrogen content are good news for Earth’s vast subsurface biosphere, and could offer clues to life on Mars and much further beyond...

December 18, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

First Airplane Flight Marks 111th Anniversary!

It was 111 years ago today that the world's first piloted, powered, controllable, heavier-than-air machine built and flown by Orville and Wilbur Wright took to the air.

December 17, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Advice to Young Science Writers: Ask “What Would Chomsky Think?”

Advice to Young Science Writers: Ask “What Would Chomsky Think?”

I’ve been pondering my profession again lately, for several reasons: shifts in the Scientific American Blog Network; the launch of a science communication program at my school, Stevens Institute of Technology, which is closely allied with a new program in science, technology and society (STS); and finally a chat with editors at IEEE Spectrum, where [...]..

December 17, 2014 — John Horgan

Google's Top Searches of 2014

Americans looked to Google for information on Ebola, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and the actor Robin Williams’s suicide this year—all of which ranked among the hottest search terms of 2014...

December 16, 2014 — Amy Nordrum
Reflections on My @SciAmBlogs Tenure

Reflections on My @SciAmBlogs Tenure

After three and a half years or so as a part of the SciAm blogging network, this my last post as a dedicated blog at Scientific American. There will be an announcement from SciAm about the reorganization of the blogging network, and PsiVid, where I’ve posted about science in TV, video and film along with [...]..

December 15, 2014 — Joanne Manaster
Erin Gee Blends Emotions, Science, Music and Robotic Pianos

Erin Gee Blends Emotions, Science, Music and Robotic Pianos

This week’s video comes from a post by Princess Ojiaku over at Science With Moxie. According to the original post: Erin Gee is a Canadian artist and composer who has created a way to directly feed human emotions into music played by robots that she built and programmed herself...

December 14, 2014 — Carin Bondar
The Greatest Science Music Video Parodies Continue

The Greatest Science Music Video Parodies Continue

Tim Blais of A Capella Science has come up with a few great new science music video parodies. First, a chemistry-themed version of Meghan Trainor’s ‘All About That Base’, and second an exam-riddled student’s version of Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake It Off’...

December 14, 2014 — Carin Bondar
Comet 67P Only Looks Gray, It’s Actually Black

Comet 67P Only Looks Gray, It’s Actually Black

The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission has now released the first narrow-angle color composite image of Comet 67P – taken through a set of red, green, and blue filters.

December 12, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
First Flexible Airplane Wing Takes Flight

First Flexible Airplane Wing Takes Flight

In our May 2014 issue, Sridhar Kota, a professor of engineering at the University of Michigan and founder and president of the company FlexSys, published an article about his long-running campaign to take complex, multipart machines and redesign them as flexible, one-piece devices (subscription required)...

December 12, 2014 — Seth Fletcher
The Art and Science of Peppermint

The Art and Science of Peppermint

I love the latest video from the folks at USC Dornsife, all about the art and science of peppermint. In addition to being a fun, fast paced and visually pleasing film, this work gives us a lot of basic information about peppermint from diverse points of view including psychology, history, art, neurobiology — and more...

December 11, 2014 — Carin Bondar
The Art and Science of Peppermint

The Art and Science of Peppermint

I love the latest video from the folks at USC Dornsife, all about the art and science of peppermint. In addition to being a fun, fast paced and visually pleasing film, this work gives us a lot of basic information about peppermint from diverse points of view including psychology, history, art, neurobiology — and more...

December 11, 2014 — Carin Bondar

Big Mirrors, High Hopes: Extremely Large Telescope Is A Go

In astronomy, bigger is almost always better. The size of a telescope’s aperture (or primary optical element) not only determines how many pesky little photons it can capture, but also the ultimate resolution of the image that can be formed...

December 9, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
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